SHY by Deborah Freedman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"An exquisite treasure for bashful readers, animal lovers, and anyone who's ever wanted a friend. (Picture book. 3-7, adult)"
Someone extremely shy finds a friend. Read full book review >
THE LOST HOUSE by Brian Cronin
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A clever, irresistible, visually engaging search-and-find exercise. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Before Grandad can take his two grandchildren to the park, he needs their help to find various personal items he's lost. Read full book review >

THE WISH TREE by Kyo Maclear
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"Sweet in mood but incomplete in logic. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A boy, his sled, and a fantasy about a very special tree: could it possibly be true? Read full book review >
THE ELDERS by Inbali Iserles
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A magical adventure with thrills, heartbreak, and an endearing heroine, this will please series fans and leave them poised for the next. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
A young fox travels alone through the wilderness in search of her missing brother. Read full book review >
JINGLE by Gordon Korman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"Good fun. (Mystery. 8-12)"
It's Christmas! Santa, elves, snow, presents…and grand theft! Read full book review >

THE INQUISITOR'S TALE by Adam Gidwitz
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A masterpiece of storytelling that is addictive and engrossing. (Fantasy. 11 & up)"
Gidwitz strikes literary gold with this mirthful and compulsively readable adventure story set in medieval France. Read full book review >
HOW TO TRACK A TRUCK by Jason Carter Eaton
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"These trucks are stuck in a concept that isn't up to speed, with a plot that ultimately sputters and runs out of gas. (Picture book. 4-7)"
An Asian boy named Mike narrates a guide to finding and taming a truck as an unusual type of pet. Read full book review >
MY MEGA MONSTERPEDIA by Catherine Leblanc
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"Most needed where monsters, whether small Icky Yickies or the enticing video Obsess-O-Tron, have become worrisome pests. (Picture book. 7-9)"
An alphabetical gallery of (mostly) household monsters to conquer, from the Aysnortuptoys to the troublesome but diminutive Zzeworriez. Read full book review >
VARMINTS by Andy Hirsch
by Andy Hirsch, illustrated by Andy Hirsch
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"Yee-haw! Pa never does show up, but there are plainly more misadventures in store before trail's end. (Graphic Western. 11-13)"
Two children get into one pickle after another as they search the Old West for their elusive dad. Read full book review >
MONDAY IS WASH DAY by MaryAnn Sundby
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A labor of love itself, this picture book delivers readers to an early time and leaves them feeling as warm and sun-kissed as a sheet fresh off the line. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Two sisters help with the week's laundry in an era when doing the wash required much more than the quick turn of a knob. Read full book review >
ANIMALS by Ingela P. Arrhenius
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"This title will most likely be appreciated as an artifact in its own right or used as a talking point for discussion about these mostly familiar animals. (Picture book. 3-5)"
A striking poster album of animals. Read full book review >
A WELL-MANNERED YOUNG WOLF by Jean Leroy
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 30, 2016

"So where do good manners get you? Hunger here and salvation there. Life is a mystery. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A young wolf goes hunting for the first time and learns his prey can be crafty—not to mention a bunch of liars. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >