SWIMMING, SWIMMING by Gary Clement
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 12, 2015

"Friendship and a pool: the perfect summer combination, here captured to a T. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A quartet of friends—three boys and one girl—revel in the watery joys afforded by the local public pool. Read full book review >
THE MOSQUITO BROTHERS by Griffin Ondaatje
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 12, 2015

"A few moments of manufactured drama aside, a ragged chain of set pieces. (Animal fantasy. 10-12)"
A late-blooming urban mosquito meets his country-raised half brother for the first time. Read full book review >

THE BOYS WHO CHALLENGED HITLER by Phillip Hoose
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 12, 2015

"A superbly told, remarkable true story and an excellent addition to stories of civilian resistance in World War II. (photos, bibliography, chapter notes) (Nonfiction. 12-18)"
A handful of Danish teens takes on the occupying Nazis is this inspiring true story of courageous resistance. Read full book review >
DRIVE by Kellen Hatanaka
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 12, 2015

"A fine showcase for the illustrator's talents, but a thin entry in a crowded field. (Picture book. 2-4)"
One-word captions (and two short phrases) point out opposites of diverse sorts on a road trip through town and countryside. Read full book review >
THIS IS MY ROCK by David Lucas
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 12, 2015

"A rocky climb to wisdom. (Picture book. 3-6)"
In another philosophical outing from Lucas (A Letter for Bear, 2013), a goat repels all comers from a rugged peak, then finds its claim of ownership a hollow one.Read full book review >

OWL BOY by Brian Schatell
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 15, 2015

"An offbeat tale about following your dreams, no matter where they might lead (though older readers will note the cautionary tale of taking your passions a bit too far). (Picture book. 3-7)"
Al loves owls. Read full book review >
ASTRID THE FLY by Maria Jönsson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 15, 2015

"Not natural history by any means, but this slice of (fly) life is beguilingly, infectiously whimsical. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Astrid the fly introduces readers to her (huge) family and their home behind the sofa in this Swedish import. Read full book review >
MR. HAPPY AND MISS GRIMM by Antonie Schneider
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 15, 2015

"Stick with the old standby: Roger Hargreaves' Mr. Happy (1980). (Picture book. 4-7)"
Attitude rubs off in this peculiar German import first published as Herr Glück & Frau Unglück.Read full book review >
GARGOYLES GONE AWOL by Clémentine Beauvais
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 15, 2015

"Beauvais' narrative zips breezily along and gets to the end with several moments of laugh-out-loud cleverness—and that's enough to grab readers. (Mystery. 9-12)"
Young Sesame Seade returns for a second round of detective work around and about the colleges of Cambridge University (Sleuth on Skates, 2014), this time aided by friends Toby and Gemma.Read full book review >
AMAZING PLANT POWERS by Loreen Leedy
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 15, 2015

"A strong demonstration of plant powers but a weak teaching tool. (plant projects, glossary) (Informational picture book. 5-8)"
Spike E. Prickles and his friends show off a wide variety of plant adaptations. Read full book review >
SIMPLE MACHINES by David A. Adler
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 15, 2015

"Still, this is as solid a look at simple machines as any that exists outside of dry textbooks, and at least readers can imagine a narrative for the two young boys. (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
Continuing to branch out into science concepts (Things That Float and Things That Don't, 2013), the math and biography whiz tackles the elementary topic of simple machines. Read full book review >
ALWAYS TWINS by Teri Weidner
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 15, 2015

"Although obviously fitting for twins, the story's themes can easily apply to other siblings and friends as well. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Being twins isn't all it's quacked up to be for two duckling siblings. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Mona Eltahawy
April 28, 2015

In her debut book, Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution, Egyptian-American journalist and commentator Mona Eltahawy mounts an angry indictment of the treatment of women throughout the Arab world. Born in Egypt, she spent her childhood in London, moving with her family to Saudi Arabia when she was 15. Her shock was immediate and visceral: “It felt as though we’d moved to another planet whose inhabitants fervently wished women did not exist,” she recalls. Women could not travel, work or even go to a doctor’s appointment without male approval. We talk to Eltahawy this week on Kirkus TV about her arresting new book. View video >