ANIMAL JOURNEYS by Patricia Hegarty
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2017

"An appealing invitation to elementary-age readers to marvel at animals who share their world. (Informational picture book. 7-10)"
A pint-sized compendium of facts about remarkable animal travels. Read full book review >
THINGS THAT GROW by Libby Walden
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2017

"A gem of a small book, thoughtfully made for small hands and, with its heavy paper and sewn binding, loving handling. (Informational picture book. 6-12)"
A compendium of things in the universe that grow—including the universe itself—presented in an illustrated informational picture book divided into chapters. Read full book review >

DR. POTTS, MY PETS HAVE SPOTS! by Rod Hull
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2017

"'Veterinary misadventure' doesn't normally pair with 'rollicking read-aloud,' but here it does. (Picture book. 3-6)"
When Mr. Betts brings all his pets to the vet for a cure for spots, it takes several attempts and choices of medicine to finally produce a satisfying result. Read full book review >
KING & KAYLA AND THE CASE OF THE MISSING DOG TREATS by Dori Hillestad Butler
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2017

"The author of The Buddy Files whips up a light mystery fare for the younger set. (Early reader. 6-8)"
In a brand-new series a girl and a dog are detectives, finding mysteries in everyday events. Read full book review >
FANTASTIC FLOWERS by Susan Stockdale
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2017

"This is a book to closely pore over—perhaps before a trip to the park or a botanical garden for real-life practice. (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
The unique shapes and patterns of 17 exotic and common flowers are exhibited in this optically striking display that points to the plants' visual similarities to other objects, animals, or people. Read full book review >

LIBRARIAN by Lucy M.  George
by Lucy M. George, illustrated by AndoTwin
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2017

"Well-intended but poorly executed, this book may fill a gap on a community-helpers shelf but it's not likely to foster a love of reading or libraries on its own. (Informational picture book. 5-8)"
A librarian takes a boy named Evan on a tour of a library. Read full book review >
GRADUATION DAY by Piotr Parda
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2017

"A possible discussion starter, though enigmatic to a fault. (Picture book. 11-18)"
A subtle reminder that education is a gift no amount of bullying can spoil. Read full book review >
WONDERS OF THE USA by Carron Brown
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2017

"Anemic selections of basic facts paired to a visual trick that is only fitfully exploited with imagination. (Informational novelty. 7-9)"
A "whistle-stop" tour of natural, historical, and cultural marvels, from Denali to the Everglades, the Golden Gate Bridge to Mardi Gras. Read full book review >
BABIES COME FROM AIRPORTS by Erin Dealey
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2017

"While some families may 'come from' adoption, babies simply do not come from airports. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A celebration of a multiracial family formed through international adoption. Read full book review >
MY PICTURES AFTER THE STORM by Éric Veillé
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2017

"Droll, imagination-stretching ways to get from here to there, from this to that, from now to later. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A whimsical series of before-and-after images, from the author of The Bureau of Misplaced Dads (illustrated by Pauline Martin, 2015). Read full book review >
A CASE IN ANY CASE by Ulf Nilsson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2017

"May Gordon and Buffy detect again! (Mystery. 6-9)"
Two cases for the forest detectives! Read full book review >
WHERE'S THE BALLERINA? by Anna Claybourne
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 1, 2017

"Both balletomanes and seek-and-find lovers should enjoy this performing-arts variation on a popular picture-book game. (Picture book. 6-10)"
Waltz away, Waldo—it's a ballerina we're looking for. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >