SEAVER THE WEAVER by Paul Czajak
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"A salutary tribute to the benefits of thinking outside the orb. (Picture book. 6-8)"
A web designer of the eight-legged sort experiments with geometric shapes in the face of pressure from his many conformist sibs. Read full book review >
IN TODD WE TRUST by Louise Galveston
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"Instead of satire, readers get a zany adventure, which would be perfectly satisfactory—if it were zany enough. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
This sequel to By the Grace of Todd (2014) sees the return of the title character and his acolytes.Read full book review >

FRANK EINSTEIN AND THE ELECTRO-FINGER by Jon Scieszka
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"There's so much actual information here that the story could pass as a textbook, but science and Scieszka fans won't likely mind. (Science fiction/humor. 8-10)"
Kid genius Frank Einstein's back for a second shocking (and silly) science adventure. Read full book review >
THE SCHNOZ OF DOOM by Andrea Beaty
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"Armageddon-averting fun for fans of Jon Scieszka's Spaceheadz and M.T. Anderson's Pals in Peril. (Adventure. 8-12)"
Can Earth again be in peril from extraterrestrial bunnies? Read full book review >
PUBLIC SCHOOL SUPERHERO by James Patterson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 16, 2015

"A smart and kind story topped with just the right amount of social justice. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Kenny's dreams of superpowered heroics provide a respite from his tough school. Read full book review >

PRICKLY JENNY by Sibylle Delacroix
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 15, 2015

"With its small trim size, this empathetic offering might be just the thing for little ones to take off by themselves when they're feeling prickly. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A girl is in low spirits all day. Read full book review >
WANDERING WHALE SHARKS by Susumu Shingu
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 15, 2015

"The overall imagery and poetic text combine to create a pleasing book on an unlikely topic for the youngest children. (Informational picture book. 3-8)"
The largest living fish on the planet is feted with spare text and illustrations in blue, black and white. Read full book review >
LOOK! by Édouard Manceau
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 15, 2015

"This clever, engaging offering invites children to review basic concepts while seeing the world around them in new ways. (Board book. 2-5)"
An oversized, interactive board book in which a rectangular die cut becomes a window on the world. Read full book review >
A TICKET AROUND THE WORLD by Natalia Diaz
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 15, 2015

"Young readers need to know about their peers in other countries, but this looks like a book their grandparents might have read. (Informational picture book. 5-8)"
Rather than a comprehensive trip around the world, a quick expedition to 13 far-flung countries. Read full book review >
ENCHANTMENT LAKE by Margi Preus
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 15, 2015

"Francie may not be a real detective, but she is so confident that there's never really any doubt of her eventual success, making her good company but perhaps not riveting reading for hard-core mystery fans. (Mystery. 11-16)"
Preus, author of the Newbery Honor-winning Heart of a Samurai (2010), is known for her engrossing historical fiction. Now she changes pace and offers a mystery set in the present.Read full book review >
WHERE I BELONG by Tara White
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 15, 2015

"Though stories of contemporary Indian youth are badly needed, this one fails to engage. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
A Mohawk girl adopted into a white family gets in touch with her heritage against the backdrop of the 1990 Oka crisis in Quebec. Read full book review >
SEE YOU NEXT YEAR by Andrew Larsen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 15, 2015

"Taken as a whole, the book affectionately captures the nostalgic air of vacations past, seashells gathered and summer friends left behind—a great book for the car ride. (Picture book. 3-6)"
The annual summer vacation reveals familiar patterns and the joy of continuity and tradition. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >