WAR HORSE by Michael Morpurgo
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 22, 1983

"Despite relentless English and German anti-war rumination, and Joey's own supra-equine understandings: some distinct glimpses of how it was to be a war-horse—in addition to that thundering melodrama. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
In effect, a horse's eye view of the First World War—heart-rending in Black Beauty tradition, anti-war like All Quiet..., certainly unusual and dramatic. Read full book review >
THE DAY JIMMY'S BOA ATE THE WASH by Trinka Hakes Noble
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 28, 1981

"Those who respond to this sort of whipped-up frenzy can trust Kellogg's clever twists to keep the action from flagging."
A chaotic class trip to the farm is pictured with Kellogg's usual delight in disorder and related backwards, as it were, by a child whose report to her mother gets wilder and wilder as it unwinds: " 'Why were [the pigs] eating your lunches?' 'Because we threw their corn at each other, and they didn't have anything else to eat.'...'What was Jimmy's pet boa constrictor doing on the farm?' 'Oh, he brought it to meet all the farm animals, but the chickens didn't like it.'..." Read full book review >

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 8, 1981

"It's a question of sensibility."
Unquestionably a labor of love, this is set in an inn presided over by William Blake. Read full book review >
IT COULD ALWAYS BE WORSE by Margot Zemach
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1977

"The more you look at Zemach's pages the more commotion there is to notice. And it's a good story, worth repeating."
Remember the "poor unfortunate man" who feels crowded with his mother, wife, and six children in a little one-room hut—until the Rabbi instructs him to bring his chickens, goat, and cow inside as well? Read full book review >
THE BROWNSTONE by Paula Scher
Released: Oct. 19, 1973

"Finally though landlord owl works it out so that each tenant can do his thing undisturbed and undisturbing. Comic bookish city humor for the susceptible, with each move plotted out in Stan Mack's cartoon cutaways of the building.</p>"
<p>We lost count of the reshuffling of tenants shortly after the bears, who were trying to get to sleep for the winter, moved up to the second floor to get away from Miss Cat's loud piano — but then she objected to the cooking smells from the pigs who had moved down, and besides the dancing kangaroos on the third floor were now keeping the bears awake. Read full book review >

THE GLASSBLOWER'S CHILDREN by Maria Gripe
Released: May 7, 1973

"Despite the seams and weak spots, however, Gripe polishes each separate scene to fine perfection and makes each development more chilling than the last."
Unlike Gripe's contemporary Hugo and Josephine books, The Glassblower's Children is a fairy tale, with remote storybook settings, mythic themes and archetypal rather than realistic characters. Read full book review >
THE GREAT BRAIN by John D. Fitzgerald
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 18, 1967

"A funny, fast-moving, endearing book that adults will appreciate and boys will lap up."
According to J.D., Tom the Great Brain's younger brother, Adenville, Utah in 1896, is full of opportunities for an enterprising boy—Papa installs the first water closet in town (and Tom charges to see the cess pool dug, the chain pulled); J.D. catches the mumps first on purpose, has a chance to gloat over his still-swollen brothers (but Tom exacts a price for calling off his punishment); a Greek immigrant boy is badgered and bullied (and Tom earns a dollar for training him to outfight his chief tormentor); the new teacher turns out to be a tyrant (but Tom first has him fired, then rehired chastened). Read full book review >
THE ELEPHANT WHO LIKED TO SMASH SMALL CARS by Jean Merrill
Released: Aug. 1, 1967

"Smashing cars! How I love to smash small cars!' When a small car dealer opens on the street, the elephant smashes every one, so the dealer switches to large cars and (also singing a little song) smashes the elephant until the latter promises to lay off. Would you believe—a book?</p>"
<p>The elephant who likes to smash small cars smashes every small car that comes along, all the while singing "The Smashing Song" (music included): "Smashing cars! Read full book review >
THE ROBBER HOTZENPLOTZ by Otfried Preussler
Released: March 26, 1965

"Their elaborate tracking simply snares them in the robber's den, and their involved escape includes outwitting a magician. The team of Kasperl and Seppel is sort of a lumbering counterpart of Laurel and Hardy. When described in full, their outlandish actions generally seem clumsy and foolish and not really terribly humorous. The book is translated from the German and is by the same author of Thomas Scarecrow and The Wise Men of Schilda (1963).</p>"
<p>Hotzenplotz's theft of a musical coffee mill set Kasperl and his straightman friend Seppel in pursuit of the notorious bandit. Read full book review >
HARRIET THE SPY by Louise Fitzhugh
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 21, 1964

"Whether some adults will find this morally unregenerative, still it's a thoroughly realistic story with lost of very funny scenes and commentaries, and it features one of the hardest to handle, easiest to like heroines in a long time. Illustrations by the author not seen."
Harriet is an 11-year-old snub-nosed gamin with an elephant child curiosity and, let's face it, a noticing eye that runs to nastiness. Read full book review >
HARRISON LOVED HIS UMBRELLA by Rhoda Levine
Released: March 20, 1964

<p>Harrison was a fashion-first type. Read full book review >
MERRY GO ROUND IN OZ by Eloise McGraw
Released: Oct. 22, 1963

"Even the fantasy alerted child would find himself confused by allusions and assumptions of familiarity with vague sources of- dare we call it- inspiration?"
Strange amalgam. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >