DOUBLE TROUBLE FOR ANNA HIBISCUS! by Atinuke
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A double pleasure for old friends and new readers alike. (Picture book. 3-7)"
When twins arrive, Anna Hibiscus finds it hard to share her extended family. Read full book review >
Oldenglen by Robin Mason
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A well-written, engaging debut fantasy."
When Jackson's family moves to a forested area, he stumbles upon secrets that will change his life forever in this middle-grade novel. Read full book review >

TOTALLY TARDY MARTY by Erica S. Perl
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"This one can be permanently late. (Picture book. 4-7) "
A young boy who's always late for school learns to be on time and finds a friend along the way. Read full book review >
WAITING by Kevin Henkes
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Waiting as a joyful activity in itself is almost never celebrated; this Zen-like meditation might win some converts. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Five toys ranged on a windowsill exemplify existential pleasure. Read full book review >
THE NUTCRACKER COMES TO AMERICA by Chris Barton
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Nutcracker aficionados can enjoy a background overture to a Christmas classic. (author's note, illustrator's note, timeline, summary, photographs, further reading) (Picture book/biography. 5-10)"
From Russia with battling mice and waltzing flowers. Read full book review >

DINING WITH...MONSTERS! by Agnese Baruzzi
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Comfortably mild yucks for younger enumerators who aren't yet up to, for instance, French cuisine. (Novelty. 3-5)"
Ten monsters open wide to show what's in their mouths. Picky eaters had best steer clear. Read full book review >
NO MORE CUDDLES! by Jane Chapman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A fully rounded, easily associative, and visually inviting story. (Picture book. 3-7)"
As everybody knows, a bigfoot likes his privacy, even if he is built to cuddle: snuggly, soft, and silky (at least those bigfeet like Barry, who evidently knows about bathing). Read full book review >
MORE! by Tracey Corderoy
by Tracey Corderoy, illustrated by Tim Warnes
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Here is one case where more is definitely just right. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Who doesn't love getting a little more? Otto is an expert at "More!" Read full book review >
TWO MICE by Sergio Ruzzier
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"One story. Two mice. Three cheers. Lots to love. (Picture book. 3-8)"
The deceptively simple counting story of two mice, their adventure, and friendship. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"An intriguing, but uneven project in art education that delivers animal illustrations and rhymes."
In this children's book, 50 teachers create works emulating their favorite artists, with a twist. Read full book review >
PEEK-THROUGH FOREST by Jonathan Litton
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A solid read for little ones who crave the outdoors. (Board book. 2-5)"
A traipse through the woods is filled with surprises. Read full book review >
CITY BIRDS by Dean Norman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Aug. 31, 2015

"While Norman's book is pleasing and upbeat, it is only a cursory glance, lacking any real substance. (Graphic nonfiction. 6-10)"
A graphic novel tells the story of two urban falcons raising their young high upon a Midwestern edifice. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >