OUTDOOR OPPOSITES by Brenda Williams
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"An ebullient book with catchy, rhyming text that's fun to read again and again at home, in the classroom or under a tree. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Poet Williams interprets the concept of opposites in a clever, rhyming book celebrating the outdoors. Read full book review >
AH! by Géraldine  Collet
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Creepy and uncomfortable—rather like discovering that a spider is riding on your head. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A rabbit and a spider engage in a strange adventure. Read full book review >

3, 2, 1, GO! by Emily Arnold McCully
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"A sure hit. (Early reader. 3-8)"
In the newest of her early readers, McCully (Little Ducks Go, 2014) nails a common childhood scenario: a twosome is playing school and won't let a third play. Read full book review >
GOOD NIGHT, KNIGHT  by Betsy Lewin
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Clear text, amusing illustrations, and a captivating easy-to-read story make this a winner for horse-loving emerging readers. (Early reader. 4-6)"
Knight and Horse follow their dreams— literally. Read full book review >
PRICES! PRICES! PRICES! by David A. Adler
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Adler always finds a canny way into the math game, both practical and enjoyable. (Math picture book. 6-10)"
You can spell math with an "a" as in angst, aghast or agog, or you can spell it with an "A" as in Adler. Your move. Read full book review >

A BIRD IS A BIRD by Lizzy Rockwell
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Widely useful, this should be a welcome addition to the nature shelf. (Informational picture book. 3-7)"
Birds have beaks and wings and begin as eggs, like some other animals, but only a bird has feathers. Read full book review >
THE COWBOY by Hildegard Müller
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"It's rare to find a real story in a book that brand-new readers can tackle alone—Anna and Toto and the cowboy certainly deliver. (Early reader. 3-5)"
In this German import, Little Anna and her dog have an adventure at the beach. Read full book review >
LOOK OUT, MOUSE! by Steve Björkman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Easy-to-read farm high jinks. (Early reader. 3-5)"
When Farmer Fred forgets to feed his horse, bad things happen! Read full book review >
A PIG CALLED HEATHER by Harry Oulton
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"Stocked with flashes of wit, unlikely twists and narrow escapes from capture, this amiable ramble slides smoothly into the literary sty occupied by Wilbur, Babe, Mercy Watson and like talented porkers. (Animal fantasy. 8-10)"
When her "[b]est two-legged friend" moves away to London from a farm in Scotland, Heather follows—earning national celebrity on the way. Read full book review >
THE BULLET CATCH by Amy Axelrod
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"An absorbing mystery enhanced by its intriguing backdrop. (Historical mystery. 10-14)"
The Axelrods take readers to World War I-era New York City for a tale of magic, mystery and crime. Read full book review >
THE SHARK RIDER by Ellen Prager
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"A few leaky seams aside, a seaworthy sequel to Shark Whisperer (2014). (maps, afterword) (Adventure. 10-12)"
Mysterious fish kills lead a team of young Sea Guardians to the British Virgin Islands for a round of investigative dives, brushes with disaster and, yes, shark riding. Read full book review >
THE FRUITS WE EAT by Gail Gibbons
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 1, 2015

"This lacks the information of other nonfiction titles and the pizzazz of April Pulley Sayre's Go, Go, Grapes! (2012), but it may be just the ticket before a school trip to a farm. (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
The prolific Gibbons tackles fruits—how they grow, their parts, and what portions we eat. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Mona Eltahawy
April 28, 2015

In her debut book, Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution, Egyptian-American journalist and commentator Mona Eltahawy mounts an angry indictment of the treatment of women throughout the Arab world. Born in Egypt, she spent her childhood in London, moving with her family to Saudi Arabia when she was 15. Her shock was immediate and visceral: “It felt as though we’d moved to another planet whose inhabitants fervently wished women did not exist,” she recalls. Women could not travel, work or even go to a doctor’s appointment without male approval. We talk to Eltahawy this week on Kirkus TV about her arresting new book. View video >