THE LITTLE TREE THAT WOULD NOT SHARE by Nicoletta Costa
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 15, 2016

"A smart story of good news leading to grace. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A little tree is protectively proprietary about his leaves until late autumn surprises him. Read full book review >
PLACE VALUE by David A. Adler
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 15, 2016

"When paired with adult guidance, a 'valuable' look at place value. (Math picture book. 5-8)"
Adler tackles yet another difficult math concept using simple language and an excellent comparison. Read full book review >

GRANDPA LOVES YOU! by Helen Foster James
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 15, 2016

"A beloved grandparent gift purchase to be sure but also a toddler-friendly inclusion to an intergenerational storytime. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A grandfather rabbit celebrates the birth of a new baby bunny and recounts the many adventures they will have. Read full book review >
A HOLE IN THE WALL by Hans Wilhelm
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 15, 2016

"A deceptively subtle thought-provoker for preschoolers. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Four round and rubbery cartoon African animals—a wild dog, a warthog, a lion, and an elephant—find what seems to be a hole in the wall. Read full book review >
LOOKING FOR BONGO by Eric Velasquez
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 15, 2016

"Darling. (glossary) (Picture book. 2-5)"
A little boy searches for his lost toy. Read full book review >

SOMETIMES YOU WIN—SOMETIMES YOU LEARN by John C. Maxwell
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"While Maxwell's advice about winning is pretty general, his message to turn failures into opportunities to learn is a good one; here's hoping kids hear it in Wendy and Wade's tale. (Picture book. 4-8)"
"Try your best"; "Winning isn't everything"; "There's no I in teamwork"; "Be a good sport"—these are not the lessons that Maxwell presents here. Instead, he lays out a loose framework for how to win and, when that fails, how to turn losses into learning experiences. Read full book review >
OOPS, POUNCE, QUICK, RUN! by Mike Twohy
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Give this 'alphabet caper' an F for Fun. (Picture book. 4-9)"
Leave it to a cartoonist (in this case, a regular contributor to the New Yorker) to cleverly create a picture book-length comic strip out of the alphabet.Read full book review >
BEFORE I LEAVE by Jessixa Bagley
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"A reassuring and needed addition to the bookshelf on moving. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Before her family moves, Zelda cherishes time with her best friend, Aaron. Read full book review >
THE ALMOST TERRIBLE PLAYDATE by Richard Torrey
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"A mostly delightful look at the importance of compromise among friends. (Picture book. 3-8)"
A boy and a girl with different ideas of imaginative play find middle ground. Read full book review >
WHERE MY FEET GO by Birgitta Sif
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Pleasingly reflective of familiar childhood inner and outer wanderings, this picture book encourages little readers' feet and minds to run on and on. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A little panda's feet, snug in yellow moon boots, turn everyday walks into extraordinary adventures. Read full book review >
GO, LITTLE GREEN TRUCK! by Roni Schotter
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"A familiar trope with a subtle, ecological twist. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A little green truck is the farm's best work truck, until he is replaced by a bigger and better model. Read full book review >
SPACE HOSTAGES by Sophia McDougall
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"The book's odd pacing may disorient some readers, but they'll be very happy to be disoriented. (Science fiction. 8-12)"
The titles in McDougall's space-adventure series are a little misleading, and even the characters know it. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >