AUTOFOCUS by Lauren Gibaldi
Released: June 14, 2016

"Adoption entails lifelong losses along with joys, but its hard questions and nuanced complexities are airbrushed from this affluence-cushioned world. (Fiction. 12-16)"
A photography-class assignment on the meaning of family prompts Maude, an adopted high school senior in Florida, to learn about her deceased birth mother, Claire. Read full book review >
CHANGE PLACES WITH ME by Lois Metzger
Released: June 14, 2016

"An interesting, experimental near-future character study. (Science fiction. 12-18)"
Rose, a quiet, shy girl living in New York City in 2029, suddenly comes out of her shell. Read full book review >

WE WERE NEVER HERE by Jennifer Gilmore
Released: June 14, 2016

"The romance is so-so, but the dual portrayal of friendship and adjustment to a rarely discussed condition is sensitive and insightful. (Romance. 14-18)"
After 16-year-old Lizzie doubles over at summer camp, she enters the hospital and a "horror movie" of pain, tests, and vulnerability. Read full book review >
RED VELVET CRUSH by Christina Meredith
Released: June 14, 2016

"Though the ending leans toward melodrama, this fast-paced story of sibling rivalry and betrayal should appeal to a wide teen audience. (Fiction. 13-17)"
Meredith explores the difficult relationship between two sisters: one who harbors a secret talent and the other who lusts after any spotlight. Read full book review >
THE TRANSATLANTIC CONSPIRACY by G.D. Falksen
Released: June 14, 2016

"Only for insatiable fans of the genre or author. (Steampunk. 12-18)"
A historical adventure sports a steampunk veneer, like an undersea Murder on the Orient Express. Read full book review >

CURE FOR THE COMMON UNIVERSE by Christian McKay Heidicker
Released: June 14, 2016

"Teen readers deserve a thought-provoking, complex story about a boy who begins to understand his internalized misogyny; this is not that book. (Fiction. 14-18)"
A 16-year-old is forced to face his shortcomings at a rehab center for video-gaming addicts. Read full book review >
IVORY AND BONE by Julie Eshbaugh
Released: June 14, 2016

"Narrative artifice aside, this is an involving story solidly told, doing credit to its inspiration and sources. (Historical fiction. 12-18)"
A gender-flipped revisiting of Pride and Prejudice translates surprisingly well into the Ice Age—until it doesn't.Read full book review >
A HISTORY OF AMBITION IN 50 HOAXES by Gale Eaton
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 10, 2016

"We have met the hoaxsters, and they are us: family stories, human progress, and often enough the pinball nature of our history. (Nonfiction. 10-16)"
Hoaxes are a lot of fun, tell us much about ourselves, and sometimes, just sometimes, change the course of history. Read full book review >
THE COLOR OF DARKNESS by Ruth Hatfield
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 7, 2016

"While the subject matter is dark and at times raw, the message of the strength of the human spirit is ultimately uplifting. (Fantasy. 11-14)"
Book 2 in the middle-grade Book of Storms trilogy. Read full book review >
THE FLIP SIDE by Shawn Johnson
Released: June 7, 2016

"Johnson's first novel for teens is an absorbing portrait of a young athlete's quest to achieve her Olympic dreams. (Fiction. 12-16)"
Fifteen-year-old gymnast Charlie is determined to earn a place on Team USA. Read full book review >
THE WOLF'S BOY by Susan Williams Beckhorn
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 7, 2016

"This bracing, well-told story, laced with themes of self-responsibility, compassion, and honor, is both vital and nourishing. (Historical fiction. 9-14)"
Sometime in prehistory, a crippled boy and his wolf companion face coming-of-age challenges. Read full book review >
THE VANISHING THRONE by Elizabeth May
Released: June 7, 2016

"Dark, heavy, comfortably familiar reading for nonventuresome fans of the genre. (Fantasy. 13-17)"
Debutante-turned-savage fae-killer Aileana might finally get it on with her faery lover in this revelation-rich middle volume. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >