CAMP SO-AND-SO by Mary McCoy
Released: March 1, 2017

"Weird, fun, clever, and different—in a good way. (Fiction. 14-18)"
Camp is supposed to be about arts and crafts, capture the flag, and lazy days swimming in the lake, but at Camp So-and-So, nothing is as it's supposed to be, or even as it seems. Read full book review >
VAMPIRES ON THE RUN by C.M. Surrisi
Released: March 1, 2017

"An unusual approach to vampires with shudders tempered by plenty of humor. Readers will happily welcome back Quinnie and the Maiden Rockers. (Mystery. 10-14)"
Amateur sleuth and wild jumper-to-conclusions Quinnie Boyd is back in a second cozy mystery (The Maypop Kidnapping, 2016)—this time trying to determine if a pair of visiting horror writers are blood-sucking vampires. Read full book review >

WAKING IN TIME by Angie Stanton
Released: March 1, 2017

"Without sparks to sustain it, the story fizzles. (Science fiction. 14-16)"
She's going back in time; he's going forward; they meet in 1961. Read full book review >
NINJA PLANTS by Wiley Blevins
Released: March 1, 2017

"An interesting take on a subject not often covered in books for middle school and teen readers. (glossary, selected bibliography, further information, index) (Nonfiction. 12-17)"
The plant world includes many curiosities whose "sneaky" adaptations help ensure their survival and reproduction. Read full book review >
SPLINTER by Sasha Dawn
Released: March 1, 2017

"Detailed and suspenseful. (Mystery. 12-18)"
Sami still hopes that her mother is alive 10 years after she disappeared. She also hopes that her father didn't murder her. Read full book review >

EXOPLANETS by Karen Latchana Kenney
Released: March 1, 2017

"A concise companion and update to Vicki Oransky Wittenstein's Planet Hunter (2010). (index, source notes, bibliography, websites) (Nonfiction. 12-16)"
An enticing overview of tools, techniques, and discoveries in what the author rightly characterizes "a red-hot field in astronomy." Read full book review >
STRANGER THAN FANFICTION by Chris Colfer
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"A standard novel about being true to who you are. (Fiction. 15-17)"
A young, white television star breaks away from Hollywood to go on a cross-country road trip with four of his biggest fans. Read full book review >
THE MANY REFLECTIONS OF MISS JANE DEMING by J. Anderson Coats
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Ignore the lackluster title and cover. This one's a keeper. (Historical fiction. 8-14) "
A hardscrabble frontier girl finds happiness in hard work and compromise. Read full book review >
THE FREE by Lauren McLaughlin
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"A penetrating look at the power in the stories we tell ourselves but just a glancing one at the juvenile-justice system. (afterword) (Fiction. 14-18)"
A Boston-area youth in juvenile detention finds redemption in stories—his and his fellow inmates'. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"A rich, fascinating, and inspiring account of a tireless champion for women's rights. (photos, source notes, bibliography) (Biography. 11-18)"
Alice Paul lacks the name recognition of fellow suffragists Susan B. Anthony or Elizabeth Cady Stanton, but this lucid, inspiring portrait reveals her noteworthy contributions to women's rights. Read full book review >
HERE WE ARE by Kelly Jensen
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"An embarrassment of riches. (Anthology. 12-18)"
A progressive antidote to the ancient teen health textbooks that mull over the dry basics of teen identity. Read full book review >
MY EPIC BATTLE TO SAVE THE WORLD by P.J. Hoover
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"A decent sophomore dig that won't require heavy excavation. (glossary, notes) (Fantasy. 11-14)"
Combatting the god of chaos as he siphons every last drop of light from the sun is a prime excuse for skipping science camp. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >