STRANGER THAN FANFICTION by Chris Colfer
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"A standard novel about being true to who you are. (Fiction. 15-17)"
A young, white television star breaks away from Hollywood to go on a cross-country road trip with four of his biggest fans. Read full book review >
THE MANY REFLECTIONS OF MISS JANE DEMING by J. Anderson Coats
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Ignore the lackluster title and cover. This one's a keeper. (Historical fiction. 8-14) "
A hardscrabble frontier girl finds happiness in hard work and compromise. Read full book review >

THE FREE by Lauren McLaughlin
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"A penetrating look at the power in the stories we tell ourselves but just a glancing one at the juvenile-justice system. (afterword) (Fiction. 14-18)"
A Boston-area youth in juvenile detention finds redemption in stories—his and his fellow inmates'. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"A rich, fascinating, and inspiring account of a tireless champion for women's rights. (photos, source notes, bibliography) (Biography. 11-18)"
Alice Paul lacks the name recognition of fellow suffragists Susan B. Anthony or Elizabeth Cady Stanton, but this lucid, inspiring portrait reveals her noteworthy contributions to women's rights. Read full book review >
HERE WE ARE by Kelly Jensen
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"An embarrassment of riches. (Anthology. 12-18)"
A progressive antidote to the ancient teen health textbooks that mull over the dry basics of teen identity. Read full book review >

MY EPIC BATTLE TO SAVE THE WORLD by P.J. Hoover
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"A decent sophomore dig that won't require heavy excavation. (glossary, notes) (Fantasy. 11-14)"
Combatting the god of chaos as he siphons every last drop of light from the sun is a prime excuse for skipping science camp. Read full book review >
THE SHIP BEYOND TIME by Heidi Heilig
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Concluding the duology, this ingeniously plotted time twister deepens the narrative, sharpens characterization, and raises the stakes, leaving readers high and dry, wanting more. (Fantasy. 14-18)"
Her white, widowed father, Slate, having failed to remake the past, has abdicated; mixed-race Nix Song now captains the Temptation, Navigating through time to mapped destinations, real and otherwise, in this sequel to The Girl from Everywhere (2016). Read full book review >
GARDENIA by Kelsey Sutton
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Ivy's investigation is suspenseful, but the narrative also offers unexpected emotional and philosophical depths that emerge from her musings about the nature of life, death, and personal legacy. (Thriller. 14-18)"
With only a month to live, high school senior Ivy investigates her best friend's murder. Read full book review >
PURSUED by Gary Urey
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Still, Urey writes a solid adventure, with engaging protagonists, a neat gimmick, and a cliffhanger ending; here's hoping the sequel irons out the bumps. (Science fiction. 10-14)"
With a background in theater, Urey presents an action-packed tale that keeps its protagonists one step ahead of the criminals who want their high-tech transporters. Read full book review >
FAMILY GAME NIGHT AND OTHER CATASTROPHES by Mary E. Lambert
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Although broken parents are common fodder these days, this debut story is a standout. (Fiction. 9-14)"
"It's like trying to save the Titanic by bailing water with a teaspoon." That's how Annabelle regards her life ever since her mother's hoarding took over the house and her father left. Read full book review >
ONE BLOOD RUBY by Melissa Marr
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"What a mess. (Fantasy. 12-18)"
Marr (Seven Black Diamonds, 2016) continues the story about tension among various factions of the fae and their fight against humans. Read full book review >
WILD LILY by K.M. Peyton
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Not up to the standards of Peyton's best. (Historical fiction. 12-16)"
With this book, the 86-year-old Peyton celebrates her 70th year as a published author. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >