PAINLESS by S.A. Harazin
Released: March 1, 2015

"A tad predictable but emotionally engaging nonetheless. (Fiction. 12-16)"
A teen who can't feel physical pain goes through some significant emotional trauma. Read full book review >
ROCK THE BOAT by Sigmund Brouwer
Released: March 1, 2015

"A quick read for music lovers. (Fiction. 12-18)"
A young musician tries to break into the business in Nashville and becomes entrapped by a shady producer. Read full book review >

THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WALL by Simon Schwartz
Released: March 1, 2015

"Though important both culturally and historically, unfortunately what should be haunting is less than. (glossary, timeline, map) (Graphic memoir. 12-18)"
A stark and pensive glimpse at a young boy's family as they immigrate to West Berlin prior to the collapse of the Berlin Wall. Read full book review >
Released: March 1, 2015

"A chilling exposé. (Nonfiction. 13-18)"
So very rarely is anything perfect, but when the legal process malfunctions, the result can be the horror of unjust incarceration. Read full book review >
PRAIRIE FIRE by E.K. Johnston
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 2015

"Grand, heartbreaking, ennobling and unforgettable. (Fantasy. 12-18)"
This follow-up to the acclaimed The Story of Owen (2014) is part adventure, part alternative history, part friendship story, part ecological fable and all heroic saga.Read full book review >

EXPOSING TORTURE by Hal Marcovitz
Released: March 1, 2015

"Though none of the issues presented is explored in any great depth, this overview provides readers with a useful starting place for further exploration. (glossary, timeline, source notes, bibliography, websites, index) (Nonfiction. 14-18)"
This overview delves into the history of torture, from the flayings, burnings and other brutal methods used in ancient societies to the psychological and sexual torture of the 21st century, and tackles complex ethical and moral questions. Read full book review >
QUAKE by Patrick Carman
Released: Feb. 25, 2015

"An engaging end to a well-developed arc. (Dystopian romance. 13-16)"
This final installment in the Pulse trilogy starts up only moments after the ending of Tremor (2013), and the action never lets up.Read full book review >
HALF A MAN by Michael Morpurgo
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"A sorrowful yet ultimately redeeming tale. (Fiction. 12-16)"
A grandson's loving homage to his war-scarred grandfather. Read full book review >
ECHO by Pam Muñoz Ryan
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"A grand narrative that examines the power of music to inspire beauty in a world overrun with fear and intolerance, it's worth every moment of readers' time. (Historical fiction. 9-14)"
A multilayered novel set in turbulent times explores music's healing power. Read full book review >
UNLEASHED by Sophie Jordan
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"Only for romance fans. (Dystopian romance. 14-18)"
Davy's escaped from the government camp of Uninvited (2014), but she's on the run and still far from safe.Read full book review >
DREAMFIRE by Kit Alloway
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"A dark and exciting paranormal adventure that will keep patient genre fans up late. (Paranormal romance. 13-18)"
Joshlyn is expert at entering and resolving others' nightmares, but there's a new and forceful evil plaguing the Dream world that even she can't beat. Read full book review >
DOVE ARISING by Karen Bao
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"This derivative debut never finds its wings. (Science fiction. 13-18)"
In a far future in which humans have settled on the moon to escape wars and climate change on Earth, a teenage girl trains to become a soldier in order to support her family. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >