NATURE
Released: May 1, 1998

"It's a challenging title, with appeal mostly for highly motivated science enthusiasts. (index) (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
Spectacular full-color photographs and computer images will attract readers to this volume of current information about the universe, but Scott (Twins!, p. 117) assumes a lot of prior knowledge on the part of readers, and there is no glossary of terms nor timeline to help with the context. Read full book review >
ON THE HOME FRONT by Ann Stalcup
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 1998

"This child's view of WW II is certain to touch the hearts of readers. (glossary, further reading, index) (Memoir. 11-14)"
A touching memoir from a former teacher, about her experiences in Lydney, England (120 miles west of London), as a young child during WW II. Read full book review >

SNAKE DREAMER by Priscilla Galloway
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1998

"Nevertheless, even if some of the symbolism is lost on readers, and certain threads of the myth dangle, Dusa is a credible character all the way through her independent, triumphant finale. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Galloway (Truly Grim Tales, 1995) revisits the Greek myth of Medusa, the Gorgon with the head of snakes, in a page-turning, occasionally convoluted, contemporary fantasy. Read full book review >
BAT 6 by Virginia Euwer Wolff
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1998

"Wolff (Make Lemonade, 1993, etc.) is especially deft in creating a transforming, bittersweet post-war atmosphere and winning portraits of members of the communities who support, respect, and encourage their young girls, but come to question their own roles in the tragedy. (Fiction. 12-14)"
In Bear Creek Ridge and Barlow, two small Oregon towns, everyone is looking forward to the Bat 6 girls' softball game of 1949. Read full book review >
THE FALCON by Jackie French Koller
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1998

"A memorable case study in teenage guilt. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Koller follows up A Place To Call Home (1995) with this raw, funny-if-it- weren't-so-painful journal of a disabled teenager given to self-destructive behavior. Read full book review >

STRAYS LIKE US by Richard Peck
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 1998

"The novel becomes something of a treatise about a generation of children who have been cast aside by their parents; with its compelling premises and Molly's fragile but tautly convincing voice, it will be seized upon by Peck's fans, but may leave them longing for more. (Fiction. 12-14)"
With a hospitalized heroin addict for a mother and facing the prospect of another new school, Molly Moberly, 12, is a stray who delivers in an abrupt and somewhat detached narrative the details of a year in her life. Read full book review >
STAY TRUE by Marilyn Singer
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1998

"It's an unambitious, often charming sampler, sure to make readers smile, think, and dream. (Fiction. 12-15)"
Eleven well-known authors—all women—use humor, pathos, and fantasy in a skillfully wrought panoply of short stories that resound with a "you go girl" attitude toward life. Read full book review >
MY LOUISIANA SKY by Kimberly Willis Holt
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 1998

"Tiger, with her warring feelings, is a believable and likable narrator, and while the offerings of big-city living are too patly rejected, a well-developed setting and fully-realized characters make this an unusually strong coming-of-age story. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In her first YA novel, Holt gives a fresh theme sensitive and deliberate treatment: The bright child of "slow" parents comes to terms with her family's place in the community. Read full book review >
SMACK by Melvin Burgess
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1998

"Based on actual people and incidents, this harrowing tale is as compellingly real as it is tragic. (glossary) (Fiction. 13-16)"
In a Carnegie Medal—winning novel (under the UK title, Junk) that cuts to the bone, Burgess puts a group of teenage runaways through four nightmarish years of heroin addiction. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: May 1, 1998

"Well-versed scientists may find this volume interesting; however, others will find it just too difficult. (b&w photos and drawings, chronology, further reading, index) (Nonfiction. 12-15)"
This latest addition to the Portraits in Science series is somewhat disjointed and unfocused. Read full book review >
SHADOW SPINNER by Susan Fletcher
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1998

"Despite the licenses Fletcher takes with the story of Shahrazad, the novel may entice readers into the pages of Richard Burton's far richer work; they will appreciate the power of storytelling—that it may expand the soul of even the most hardened listener. (Fiction. 12-14)"
A young girl, Marjan, rescues the fabled Shahrazad from the Sultan's wrath in this exciting and thought-provoking novel from Fletcher (Flight of the Dragon Kyn, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >
SWITCHERS by Kate Thompson
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1998

"The suspense never wavers, while integral to the story are the author's deft observations on independence and human relationships, on death and loss, and more, in an atmospheric and authentic fantasy world. (Fiction. 12-15)"
Thompson has written a fantasy with the pacing of a suspense novel—an adventure written in poetic prose. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >