HAUNTED SISTER by Lael Littke
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Lenore accepts that she is a blend of two people, good and bad—is a valiant attempt to bring many ideas together, but the plotting overwhelms Littke (Blue Skye, 1991, etc.); wavering between full-blown grotesque and moments of deep feeling, her story gets lost in the middle. (Fiction. 12-14)"
A tale of twins—one dead, one alive—becomes an ineffective hybrid: part ghost story, part multiple-personality yarn, part romance. Read full book review >
SECRET LETTERS FROM 0 TO 10 by Susie Morgenstern
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"A novel to cherish. (Fiction. 9-14)"
This charming translation of a French award-winner is certain to enchant readers on this side of the Atlantic. Read full book review >

ETHAN BETWEEN US by Anna Myers
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Readers will only wish the discussion, curtailed abruptly when Ethan heroically attempts to save a retarded girl in a fire, could have been brought to a more prosaic, less explosive, ending. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Myers (The Keeping Room, 1997, etc.) returns to the red-dirt section of Oklahoma, exploring the line between inspiration and madness. Read full book review >
LOVE AMONG THE WALNUTS by Jean Ferris
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"A financial subplot and a muddle of characters, defined by their eccentricities, clog the pacing of this throwback, but when the various subplots converge and the happy endings commence, the wrap-up is resounding. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Resembling a Frank Capra or Preston Sturges movie in plot and tone, this fabulistic story from Ferris has an unconventional style and offbeat sense of humor that will delight readers or exhaust them, depending on their tolerance for screwball comedies. Read full book review >
JANEY'S GIRL by Gayle Friesen
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Claire's difficult decisions about her life, and her attempts to bring the old family secrets into the light, are balanced by the humor and warmth in the dialogue and some fine, lovingly realized characters. (Fiction. 11-14)"
Friesen's first novel is a hymn to the power of forgiveness. Read full book review >

THE PIRATE'S SON by Geraldine McCaughrean
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"The entire yarn is larger than life, and readers will be enthralled from the first line. (Fiction. 12-15)"
McCaughrean (The Bronze Cauldron, p. 661, etc.) swashes buckles with the best in this rousing tale of two British orphans stranded among Madagascar pirates with a pirate captain's troubled son. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"It's slanted toward action-oriented readers, who will find that Briticisms meld with all the other wonders of magic school. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In a rousing first novel, already an award-winner in England, Harry is just a baby when his magical parents are done in by Voldemort, a wizard so dastardly other wizards are scared to mention his name. Read full book review >
DEEP WATERS by John Herman
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"An ever-tightening thread of tension that accompanies Andy's growing discomfort will keep readers glued to the page. (Fiction. 12-16)"
When Andy, 13, arrives at Camp Winasaukee, he loves everything about it—the fresh canvas smell of the tents, the dew on the grass, and the sight of Johnny March practicing his dives. Read full book review >
GONE FROM HOME by Angela Johnson
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Ranging from anecdotes to novels-in-miniature, they are all written with an economy of expression that will appeal to less-practiced readers while still precisely—brilliantly—conveying complex situations and responses. (Short stories. 11-15)"
With her usual sensitivity to adolescent emotional landscapes fully evident in these 12 (11 new) short stories, Johnson (Humming Whispers, 1995, etc.) explores the notion of giving or receiving help in time of need. Read full book review >
JUNGLE DOGS by Graham Salisbury
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Salisbury offers readers a rare glimpse of a neighborhood most would never stumble across, but the family's concerns are universal, and the emotional strings are never pulled too tight. (Fiction. 12-14)"
A tough Hawaiian neighborhood is the unlikely setting for a 12-year-old boy's conquering of his fears in this exciting and heartwarming novel from Salisbury (Shark Bait, 1997, etc.). Read full book review >
CAST TWO SHADOWS by Ann Rinaldi
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Anna Myers's Keeping Room (1997), a less disingenuous story set in the same place and time, offers a more direct view of the unusual brutality that characterized the war in the Carolinas. (bibliography) (Fiction. 12-15)"
Skeletons come and go from a wealthy South Carolina family's closet when the British army arrives in this tale set during the Revolutionary War. Read full book review >
THE YOUNG OXFORD BOOK OF NASTY ENDINGS by Dennis Pepper
Released: Aug. 23, 1998

"Most of the stories feature children or young adults; while many of the stories are brief in length, they are all of high quality in this collection that will find an audience at Halloween and during the rest of the school year. (b&w illustrations) (Fiction. 10-14)"
Pepper (The Oxford Book of Scary Tales, 1992, etc.) has gathered 34 short stories into this collection that will certainly offer readers the occasional frisson. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >