BECOMING JOE DIMAGGIO by Maria Testa
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 2001

"A powerful, glowing, unforgettable achievement. (Poetry. 10-14)"
Joseph Paul, named for the wondrous new rookie centerfielder of the 1936 New York Yankees, has big dreams and a long hard road to travel in order to achieve them. Read full book review >
PARSIFAL’S PAGE by Gerald Morris
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 1, 2001

"So will the reader. (Fiction. 10-15)"
Morris (The Savage Damsel and the Dwarf, 2000, etc.) serves up another engaging take on Arthurian legend. Read full book review >

UNDERCURRENTS by Willo Davis Roberts
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Though she's ostensibly talking about Nikki's budding summer romance with the neighbor's son, cut short by the fire, the reader can only hope that no sequel is in the works. (Fiction. 11-14)"
A great cover, a creepy gardener-cum-madman and a maddeningly clueless, nervous, blond young stepmother (shades of Joan Fontaine) combine a gothic story with a contemporary teen problem novel—but the resulting mystery is far too easily resolved. Read full book review >
THE HERO by Ron Woods
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 2001

"It ought to attract many readers, particularly the Gary Paulsen crowd. (Fiction. 10-14)"
"It was dumb, and I'm sorry," Jamie West says after a near-disaster. Read full book review >
ALISON, WHO WENT AWAY by Vivian Vande Velde
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 2001

"The denouement, which comes in a seriocomic run to a funeral parlor the night of the eighth-grade dance, feels a little forced, but the unfolding of Susan's family's anguish is done at just the right pace, with each shard of emotion placed precisely. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Susan—who now wants people to call her Sibyl—is 14 and fiercely angry. Read full book review >

YOU DON’T KNOW ME by David Klass
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"Nevertheless, this is an engrossing story, in the vein of Laurie Halse Anderson's Speak (1999), to which readers will immediately connect. (Fiction. 12-16)"
Klass (Screen Test, 1997, etc.) has woven a captivating first-person narrative with an original voice. Read full book review >
EVVY’S CIVIL WAR by Miriam Brenaman
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"She palpably illustrates the confined life of women, bound by law and cultural norms to her father and husband when her only assets are her charms and if she's lucky, like Evvy, her cunning. (afterword, sources) (Fiction. 10-14)"
Less about the Civil War and more about the plight of slaves and the societal constraints placed on women, this is an eventful family saga. Read full book review >
TRUE BELIEVER by Virginia Euwer Wolff
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"This is a coming-of-age story with both bite and heart, which poses more questions than it answers but never runs out of hope. (Fiction. 12-16)"
When Wolff writes a book, it's an event. Read full book review >
6-321 by Michael Laser
FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"He successfully provides a genuine, non-sentimental evocation of a particular time and place as well as an understanding that growing up is an awkward, sometimes painful process no matter where or when. (Fiction. 11-14)"
In 1963 Queens, New York, Marc is just trying to get through sixth grade as effortlessly and unobtrusively as possible. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Riveting reading for students in need of inspiration, or who're overcoming disability or studying changing expectations for women. (Biography. 10-14)"
Born in 1880 in a tiny backwater in Alabama, Helen Keller lived a life familiar to many from the play and movie The Miracle Worker, as well as countless biographies. Read full book review >
THE LEGEND OF LADY ILENA by Patricia Malone
FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Mediocre, but harmless. (Fiction. 11-15)"
A sword-swinging maiden encounters dangerous intrigue in newcomer Malone's tepid historical adventure. Read full book review >
THE SHADOW CLUB RISING by Neal Shusterman
FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"The mystery and nonstop action will draw teens in; but the uncomfortable questions raised about guilt and responsibility will linger on. (Fiction. 11-15)"
Coinciding with the re-release of Shusterman's first novel (The Shadow Club, 1988), this sequel addresses the lingering consequences of hatred and revenge. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >