ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 2006

"Readers will enjoy being in the presence of eight amazing women who demonstrated 'the many ways there are to live a passionate and productive and adventurous life.' (author's note, chronologies, places to visit, photo credits, index) (Nonfiction. 10-15)"
This lively chronicle includes an arctic explorer, a medical supersleuth, a passionate educator, an intrepid reporter and an enslaved woman who walked from Mississippi to freedom in California. Read full book review >
TWO STEPS FORWARD by Rachel Cohn
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 2006

"If it lacks some of the freshness of its predecessor, it stands nevertheless as an amiably honest snapshot of the steps' lives, a little further on down the line. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Two years after the events of The Steps (2003), Annabel and Lucy and the rest of their thoroughly blended families converge on Los Angeles for a summer of angst. Read full book review >

THE BOY WHO ATE STARS by Kochka
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2006

"While flawed, or possibly somewhat lost in translation (it was first published in France in 2002), this lyrical examination of autism—and friendship—is certainly heartfelt. (Fiction. 9-14)"
When 12-year-old Lucy meets Matthew, the autistic four-year-old boy who lives upstairs, she's immediately fascinated. Read full book review >
FANTASY
Released: March 1, 2006

"Nicely disquieting. (Fantasy. 12-15)"
For the third entry in his Dark Fusion series, Shusterman gives another familiar tale both a contemporary setting (with some magic thrown in) and an ingenious, eerie twist. Read full book review >
THE WALL AND THE WING by Laura Ruby
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2006

"Less than the sum of its imaginative parts, this misses the high mark set by her Lily's Ghosts (2003). (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Gurl, like all the orphans in Hope House for the Homeless and Hopeless, doesn't remember her given name, if she ever had one, so she has to content herself with the one headmistress Terwiliger has handed her that's a borderline insult. Read full book review >

CORYDON AND THE ISLAND OF MONSTERS by Tobias Druitt
FANTASY
Released: Feb. 28, 2006

"Reading this witty, profoundly sapient take on the old tales will leave readers impatient for the sequels. (Fantasy. 11-15)"
Writing under a pseudonym, a mother-and-son team sets out to view the ancient Greek mythological landscape from a reverse angle in this captivating trilogy opener. Read full book review >
MISMATCH by Lensey Namioka
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 14, 2006

"An eye-opening read for all cultures. (Fiction. 12-14)"
"Chinese, Japanese, what's the difference?" asks a suburban Seattle high-schooler. Read full book review >
FICTION
Released: Feb. 13, 2006

"Useful in collections on the Civil War, immigration, women's rights and Charles Darwin. (afterword, bibliography) (Fiction. 11-15)"
Jennie Hodgers lived in a world without passports, naturalization papers, social security numbers and driver's licenses—none of the proofs of identification we take for granted today. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"Intriguing. (historical note) (Historical fiction. 11-15)"
Fascination with Joan of Arc has continued for over 500 years. Read full book review >
MONTMORENCY AND THE ASSASSINS by Eleanor Updale
FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"From the ominous cover of two men dueling to the madcap ending, Updale neatly ties up the drawstring on her bag of tricks, but hopefully not enough to preclude a fourth. (Historical fiction. 10-15)"
And three's a charm. Read full book review >
THE TURNING by Gloria Whelan
FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

Tanya, 16 years old in 1991 and a principal dancer with Leningrad's Kirov Ballet, is both a witness to the events of a dramatic summer and a participant in Russia's fledgling steps toward democracy. Read full book review >
MURKMERE by Patricia Elliott
FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"Wonderfully atmospheric and moody—on the border between fantasy and fiction. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Lush gothic fantasy in a culture where religion is based on the Birds of Light and the Birds of Night. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >