HOME by Kimberly Fuller
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1997

A teenager finds herself caught in the middle of a genocidal war on a distant planet in this rough-hewn debut. Read full book review >
EMILY IN LOVE by Susan Goldman Rubin
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 1997

"A surprisingly sweet, unusual story of first love. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Emily, 14, last seen in Rubin's Emily Good as Gold (1993), has fallen in love with a ``regular'' boy named Hunt, and is afraid that he'll find out she's ``different''—retarded. Read full book review >

WHERE YOU BELONG by Mary Ann McGuigan
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1997

"The strong point of the novel is that there are no easy answers: Yolanda and Liam's drug-running is catastrophic but unresolved, and, realistically, readers never know whether Fiona's father will be able to reform or if her mother can keep the family together. (Fiction. 10-14)"
This second novel from McGuigan (Cloud Dancer, 1994, not reviewed) is set in the Bronx of 1963. Read full book review >
POETRY
Released: April 1, 1997

Livingston (B Is for Baby, 1996, etc.) presents poems using the traditional Japanese forms of haiku and tanka in a seasonal array, accompanied by de Kiefte's equally spare pen-and-ink drawings. ``Not wishing to stop/his chirping the whole night long,/Cricket never does'' is the piece that gives the collection a title. Read full book review >
HONOR BRIGHT by Randall Beth Platt
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 1997

"A tour de force with a tough, unforgettable protagonist. (Fiction. 12-15)"
As WW II rages overseas, domestic battles keep a Washington family simmering in this vigorously told, unconventionally cast story. Read full book review >

THE RED-EARED GHOSTS by Vivien Alcock
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1997

"Grand fun. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Alcock (Singer to the Sea God, 1993, etc.) leavens this fantasy with generous doses of her usual sly wit, raising it a cut above other time-travel tales. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: April 1, 1997

"Such stories are well-suited to sharing. (Nonfiction. 9-14)"
Wulffson (Time Fix, 1994) sketches out the origins of 99 inventions in this entertaining volume of trivia that may launch further research for reports. Read full book review >
TANGERINE by Edward Bloor
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 1997

"Readers are going to want more from this author. (Fiction. 11-15)"
A legally blind seventh-grader with clearer vision than most wins acceptance in a new Florida school as his football-hero older brother self-destructs in this absorbing, multi-stranded debut. Read full book review >
GALILEO by Paul Hightower
BIOGRAPHY
Released: April 1, 1997

"An activities section at the end of the book offers instructions for making a thermometer, doing free- fall gravity experiments, using a pendulum, and constructing a telescope. (b&w photos, not seen, chronology, notes, glossary, further reading, index) (Nonfiction. 9-15)"
An astonishing and readable account in the Great Minds of Science series that reveals how Galileo, a brilliant and creative scientist, ``among the first to practice the scientific method'' in the 17th century, was tried, convicted of heresy, and imprisoned for the rest of his life for observing, then teaching and writing about scientific theories that went against the beliefs of the Catholic Church. Read full book review >
THE LIBRARY CARD by Jerry Spinelli
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1997

"Spinelli is a shrewd storyteller, balancing lighter moments with provocative ones to meaningful effect. (Fiction. 8-14)"
Spinelli (The Bathwater Gang Gets Down to Business, 1992, etc.) has spun four disparate stories linked through the inanimate object that appears in each—a library card. Read full book review >
TWILIGHT IN GRACE FALLS by Natalie Honeycutt
Released: April 1, 1997

A fully realized world is created by Honeycutt (Whistle Home, 1993, etc.) in this well-written story of a mill town's economic demise. Read full book review >
TOMATOES, POTATOES, CORN, AND BEANS by Sylvia A. Johnson
FOOD & COOKING
Released: April 1, 1997

"Strictly for research, this history has a redeeming quality: the lovely 16th- and 17th-century black-and-white illustrations and archival prints reproduced from old herbals and antique books. (index, not seen, maps, notes, bibliography) (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
Subtitled ``How the Foods of the Americas Changed Eating Around the World,'' this is a tedious history of the foods that originated in America and are now eaten worldwide. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >