PRAIRIE WHISPERS by Frances Arrington
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 2003

"A truly engaging story. (Fiction. 10-14)"
There's mystery beneath the quiet prairie vistas. Read full book review >
FRICTION by E.R. Frank
FICTION
Released: May 1, 2003

"Frank's focus on the highly combustible environment of a classroom full of pubescent children and the chaos one abused teen can bring to those around her is subtly done, and will be immediately recognizable to her readers. (Fiction. 11-14)"
Alex is 12, teetering on the cusp of puberty, and enormously happy with her life. Read full book review >

ACT I, ACT II, ACT NORMAL by Martha Weston
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 2003

"Topher navigates his way through it all and finds success on the stage and a sure sense of his place in the world. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Into the middle school world of Populars, Jocks, Goths, Losers, and generally pissed-off and kiss-ass kids comes Christopher Blakely, known as Topher to his friends. Read full book review >
FANTASY
Released: May 1, 2003

"Purchase where the earlier titles are popular. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Three separate plots intertwine to conclude the fantasy trilogy. Read full book review >
SHOPAHOLIC by Judy Waite
FICTION
Released: May 1, 2003

"Although this largely gloomy story ends on an optimistic note for the protagonist, an all-pervasive sense of gray keeps the material flat and it fails to generate the emotional wallop that it should. (Fiction. 12-14)"
To win over a glamorous but unscrupulous girl, an unhappy youngster uses the household money and her mother's credit card to buy her new chum the latest fashions. Read full book review >

STORM CATCHERS by Tim Bowler
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 2003

"Spanning just four days, the drama is packed with suspense elements: a spooky lighthouse, a child with ESP, ghosts, infidelity, blackmail, cracks in the family cement—Bowler has skillfully crafted them into a compelling story. (Fiction. 12-16)"
From the chilling opening, when Emma, 13, is kidnapped, to the stormy conclusion, this ominous story will keep readers guessing. Read full book review >
COLD IN SUMMER by Tracy Barrett
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 2003

"A genuine ghost story without coincidental explanations that will draw readers eerily in. (Fiction. 10-14)"
No way does Ariadne want to spend her seventh-grade year in a hick town in Tennessee just because her mom got a job at the university there. Read full book review >
ONE SHOT by Susan Glick
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 2003

"Believable, empathetic, and definitely in focus. (Fiction. 12-16)"
Lorrie's 15th summer developed, literally, differently from what she expected. Read full book review >
FLYING SOUTH by Laura Malone Elliott
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 2003

"Elliott's sure hand explores a complicated chapter in America's ambivalence toward race, including the attitude many white people held regarding the social changes all around them. (Fiction. 9-14)"
It's the sultry summer of '68 in Charlottesville, Virginia. Read full book review >
THE SNOW PONY by Alison Lester
ANIMALS
Released: April 28, 2003

"Still, horse lovers will persevere. (Fiction. 10-15)"
A somewhat incoherent adventure set in Australia's plains. Read full book review >
MIND GAMES by Jeanne Marie Grunwell
FANTASY
Released: April 21, 2003

"A good source list of actual adult and children's publications related to the subject is included as part of the report's bibliography and will be appreciated by those who remain curious and attentive enough to read through the whole story. (Fiction. 11-14)"
The six members of the Clearview Middle School Mad Science Club are inadvertently brought together during an after-school registration snafu. Read full book review >
CRANDALLS’ CASTLE by Betty Ren Wright
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 15, 2003

"This mistress of spooky once again delivers a thought-provoking thriller. (Fiction. 10-14)"
For seven years—since her mother's death—Sophia has been shuffled around. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >