CURE FOR THE COMMON UNIVERSE by Christian McKay Heidicker
Released: June 14, 2016

"Teen readers deserve a thought-provoking, complex story about a boy who begins to understand his internalized misogyny; this is not that book. (Fiction. 14-18)"
A 16-year-old is forced to face his shortcomings at a rehab center for video-gaming addicts. Read full book review >
IVORY AND BONE by Julie Eshbaugh
Released: June 14, 2016

"Narrative artifice aside, this is an involving story solidly told, doing credit to its inspiration and sources. (Historical fiction. 12-18)"
A gender-flipped revisiting of Pride and Prejudice translates surprisingly well into the Ice Age—until it doesn't.Read full book review >

A HISTORY OF AMBITION IN 50 HOAXES by Gale Eaton
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 10, 2016

"We have met the hoaxsters, and they are us: family stories, human progress, and often enough the pinball nature of our history. (Nonfiction. 10-16)"
Hoaxes are a lot of fun, tell us much about ourselves, and sometimes, just sometimes, change the course of history. Read full book review >
THE COLOR OF DARKNESS by Ruth Hatfield
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 7, 2016

"While the subject matter is dark and at times raw, the message of the strength of the human spirit is ultimately uplifting. (Fantasy. 11-14)"
Book 2 in the middle-grade Book of Storms trilogy. Read full book review >
THE FLIP SIDE by Shawn Johnson
Released: June 7, 2016

"Johnson's first novel for teens is an absorbing portrait of a young athlete's quest to achieve her Olympic dreams. (Fiction. 12-16)"
Fifteen-year-old gymnast Charlie is determined to earn a place on Team USA. Read full book review >

THE WOLF'S BOY by Susan Williams Beckhorn
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 7, 2016

"This bracing, well-told story, laced with themes of self-responsibility, compassion, and honor, is both vital and nourishing. (Historical fiction. 9-14)"
Sometime in prehistory, a crippled boy and his wolf companion face coming-of-age challenges. Read full book review >
THE VANISHING THRONE by Elizabeth May
Released: June 7, 2016

"Dark, heavy, comfortably familiar reading for nonventuresome fans of the genre. (Fantasy. 13-17)"
Debutante-turned-savage fae-killer Aileana might finally get it on with her faery lover in this revelation-rich middle volume. Read full book review >
DOREEN by Ilana Manaster
Released: June 7, 2016

"While some might find pleasure in the ironic tone of this novel, overall it's trifling at best. (Fiction. 14-17)"
A retelling of The Picture of Dorian Gray set in a New England prep school. Read full book review >
THE CRESSWELL PLOT by Eliza Wass
Released: June 7, 2016

"A harrowing, pulpy page-turner along the compulsive lines of Flowers in the Attic. (Fiction. 14-18)"
A girl struggles to break the cultlike bonds tying her and her siblings to their tyrannical, religious father. Read full book review >
THE GREAT WHITE SHARK SCIENTIST by Sy Montgomery
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 7, 2016

"This appreciative introduction to a much-maligned species will thrill readers while it encourages them to see great white sharks in a new way. (maps, bibliography, Web resources, acknowledgments, index) (Nonfiction. 10-15)"
"They're laid back. They're calm. They're beautiful." Read full book review >
ROCKS FALL EVERYONE DIES by Lindsay Ribar
Released: June 7, 2016

"A fresh and substantive story about family, love, and deciding who you want to be in the world. (Paranormal suspense. 12-18)"
A teenage boy learns that the power to steal people's innermost feelings is both a blessing and curse. Read full book review >
WHEN FRIENDSHIP FOLLOWED ME HOME by Paul Griffin
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 7, 2016

"Entrancing, magical, tragic, and uplifting. (Fiction. 10-14)"
A former foster child deals with love and loss and love again. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >