THE BURNING BABY by John Gordon
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"For stout hearts only. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Five macabre tales of murder or suicide victims returning to exact gruesome retribution: Bernard conceals the body of the pregnant local teenager he's killed beneath a huge bonfire, only to have a ``Burning Baby'' crawl out of the fire's heart and into his lap; a corpse rises to drag its murderer ``Under the Ice'' of a frozen fen; a retired schoolteacher feeds her illegitimate granddaughter to the ``Eels'' in a canal—and the favor is returned (``When the sun came up and filled the room with warmth, Miss Jervis lay quite still. Read full book review >
LOMBARDO'S LAW by Ellen Wittlinger
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

In a witty, touching first novel, 15-year-old Justine Trainor's borderline nerd image is pushed to the limit when Justine spends time with new neighbor Mike Lombardo, an eighth grader who shares her passion for avant-garde movies. Read full book review >

LEONARD BERNSTEIN by Johanna Hurwitz
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Chronology; bibliography; index not seen. (Biography. 10-14)"
An interesting, well-balanced biography of this phenomenon of the 20th-century American musical scene, emphasizing the many facets of Bernstein's achievement (pianist/conductor/composer/media personality) and his identity as a Jew, and wisely (for this audience) ignoring the details of his convoluted personal life. Read full book review >
EMILY GOOD AS GOLD by Susan Goldman Rubin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"(Fiction. 10-14)"
Emily Gold's parents have always told her she's ``good as gold,'' but she's heard the hushed conversations about ``developmentally disabled'' and knows her ``head doesn't work right.'' Her early-adolescent interests and openly stated wish to have a baby and be treated like a grown-up alarm her protective parents, especially her father, who warns that ``Boys are after only one thing.'' Emily is an innocent; her reach for independence brings some close calls, but her father finally admits, respectfully, ``You've got a good head on your shoulders, kiddo.'' Skillfully depicting Emily's evolving relationships with friends, family, and self, Rubin sympathetically portrays a likable girl's pain and vulnerability as she aspires to be ``a normal, regular, real thirteen-year-old teenage girl.'' A fine coming-of-age story that deserves a wide audience for its subtly delivered message. Read full book review >
LEARNING BY HEART by Ronder Thomas Young
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A fine debut by a writer to watch. (Fiction. 9-14)"
The slow awakening of a 10-year-old's consciousness of racial division. Read full book review >

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Index not seen. (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
Though the title gives little hint of the mythological content, the scholarly information here on Native American buildings in North America—Iroquois longhouse, Navajo hogan, Pueblo kiva, and a variety of California and Northwest coast dwellings, tipis, lodges, and sweathouses—is intertwined with myths and legends concerning their creation. Read full book review >
HARRIS AND ME by Gary Paulsen
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"The fecund Paulsen continues to extend his range: an earthy, wonderfully comic piece. (Fiction. 11-15)"
As the boy explains, he's 11 years old that early-50's summer when a deputy sheriff dumps him with distant relatives on a north country farm—one in a long succession of makeshifts arranged in lieu of the parents who drink Four Roses neat from jelly jars and are "pretty much mean whenever they [are] conscious." Read full book review >
FREAK THE MIGHTY by Rodman Philbrick
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Easily read but compelling: an intriguing and unusual story. (Fiction. 10-14)"
``The unvanquished truth'' concerning the extraordinary friendship between Kevin (``Freak''), a brilliant 12-year-old whose birth defect prevents growth, and gigantic Max, who recognizes in his new two-foot-tall neighbor the feisty kid with crutches he knew in daycare years ago. Read full book review >
OTHERS SEE US by William Sleator
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A weak story from an author who's done much better. (Fiction. 12-14)"
The tension never quite pulls tight in this confusing chiller, perhaps because Sleator introduces too many contrivances. Read full book review >
LOUISA MAY ALCOTT by Louisa May Alcott
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Chronology; sources; index. (Biography. 10-14)"
A few revealing fragments: excerpts from the diary Alcott started at ten; her mother's responses to it; Louisa's own comments, added as an adult (when she destroyed much of the original diary); letters; and parallel quotes from Little Women (pairing Beth's death with Alcott's account of her sister Lizzie's—the only entry dating from her 20s—is particularly poignant; in its simplicity and directness, the diary is even more eloquent). Read full book review >
LOST MAGIC by Berthe Amoss
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Still, it's accessible and may be a bridge to Napoli—and to Hendry's Quest for a Maid (1990). (Fiction. 10-14)"
From the author of The Mockingbird Song (1988), a tale that's a curious contrast to Napoli's The Magic Circle (p. 789). Read full book review >
SON-OF-THUNDER by Stig Holmås
by Stig Holmås, translated by Anne Bonn, illustrated by John Hurford
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Interesting because of its source, and for what truths it holds about a terrible conflict. (Fiction. 11-14)"
By a Norwegian librarian who has `` `spent a lifetime' studying the Chiricahua Apaches,'' a novel that ``was named the Best Book for Children and Young People by the Norwegian Ministry of Culture'' in 1985. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >