ONCE UPON A KISS by Robin Palmer
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"While the road may be well-trodden, readers are still in for a breezy, enjoyable ride. (Fantasy. 12-16)"
Back to the Future meets The Breakfast Club for Generation Z.Read full book review >
SUPERHEROES DON'T EAT VEGGIE BURGERS by Gretchen Kelley
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A sweet exploration of an evolving friendship burdened by some tiresome tropes; should Kelley focus on the former and move past the latter, she will do well. (Fiction. 10-14)"
A middle school student solves his problems with a seemingly magic journal. Read full book review >

MR. LEMONCELLO'S LIBRARY OLYMPICS by Chris Grabenstein
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Dewey like this? Of course, and so will upper-elementary and middle school readers and gamers alike. (Fiction. 9-14)"
Can the hometown champions defeat teams from around the country in a new contest at Mr. Lemoncello's fantastic library? Read full book review >
MY NAME IS NOT FRIDAY by Jon Walter
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A heartbreaking story about family, justice, and the resilience of the human spirit. (Historical fiction. 12-16)"
Samuel, a freeborn black orphan, is sold into slavery during the height of the Civil War. Read full book review >
WINTER'S BULLET by William Osborne
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"An intriguing alternative history lesson wrapped in a nail-biting adventure. (Historical fiction. 12-14)"
Hitler plans to unleash his greatest weapon in a last-ditch effort to win World War II. Read full book review >

THIS IS WHERE IT ENDS by Marieke Nijkamp
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"This brutal, emotionally charged novel will grip readers and leave them brokenhearted. (Fiction. 14-18)"
A minute-by-minute account of mass murder at a high school by a former student. Read full book review >
THE IMPOSTOR QUEEN by Sarah Fine
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Full of passion, fire, and ice. (Fantasy. 12-16)"
She's spent years preparing to become an all-powerful queen and to wield her land's magic, but that's not her destiny at all. Read full book review >
IDENTITY CRISIS by Melissa Schorr
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"For teens looking for love in all the wrong places, this social media fable is dramatized with love triangles, revenge, and rock-'n'-roll. (Fiction. 13-17)"
Teenage girls play out a revenge drama online only to discover that there's no hiding one's true identity. Read full book review >
THE HEIR AND THE SPARE by Emily Albright
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"Still, the magic of falling in love (some hot kissing scenes) and the challenges of difficult moral decisions are well-portrayed and have timeless appeal. (Fiction. 14-18)"
Evie Gray is an American freshman at Oxford University with a few unusual twists to her life story. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"A worthwhile addition to every library collection and a natural for military-history enthusiasts. (Nonfiction. 12-18)"
Hollihan examines the wartime service of 12 men and three women and how it affected the rest of their lives. Read full book review >
DEAD ZONES by Carol Hand
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"Deeply depressing and not for casual readers, but older students will find this an informative introduction to a serious environmental issue. (Nonfiction. 12-16)"
An experienced science writer explains the growing phenomenon of dead zones in the world's waters, describing their effects, their likely causes, and efforts to reduce their spread. Read full book review >
SPACE JUNK by Karen Romano Young
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"Between her well-tempered writing style and her atypical subject, Young will have readers enthralled. (Nonfiction. 12-18)"
Humans have polluted the land, the seas, the top of Mount Everest—next stop: outer space. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >