SEED by Lisa Heathfield
Released: April 2, 2015

"An absorbing treatment of an ever interesting subject. (Fiction. 12-18)"
Pearl has grown up inside a cult and knows little about the real world. Read full book review >
I AM HER REVENGE by Meredith Moore
Released: April 4, 2015

"More soap operatic than Shakespearian. (Thriller. 14-18)"
A girl raised to be a weapon by her brutal mother must decide whether she's willing to ruin a boy's life for the sake of revenge. Read full book review >

LIES I TOLD by Michelle Zink
Released: April 7, 2015

"Highly readable, gripping and touching. (Thriller. 12-18)"
A girl struggles to hold onto her own identity within her family of thieves. Read full book review >
THE BLACK RECKONING by John Stephens
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"This fantasy trilogy closes with both satisfying finality and the realistic, requisite heartbreak that comes with saying goodbye. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Kids grow up so quickly these days—at least they do when they are prophetically linked to magical relics. Read full book review >
Released: April 7, 2015

"Teens interested in any and all aspects of a career in dance will find useful and entertaining information here. (resources, glossary, notes, bibliography) (Nonfiction. 12-16)"
From ballet to Broadway and from Hollywood to hip-hop: a how-to. Read full book review >

NELSON MANDELA by Beatrice Gormley
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"A complete, informative introduction to a nonviolent revolutionary and one of history's most important champions of human rights. (photos, timeline, glossary, source notes) (Biography. 10-14)"
A young troublemaker grows up to be a civil rights activist, president of his country and world leader in this overview of the life and work of the Nobel Prize-winning peacemaker. Read full book review >
DIARY OF A WAITRESS by Carolyn Meyer
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"A slowly paced and occasionally even tedious depiction of a small slice of American railroad history. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
Although more than a year too young for the position, almost-17-year-old Kitty takes a job as a Harvey Girl, one of the well-trained waitresses that staffed a national restaurant chain serving rail passengers from the late-19th to mid-20th centuries. Read full book review >
FIG by Sarah Elizabeth Schantz
Released: April 7, 2015

"Achingly gorgeous, with a baffling end. (author's note) (Historical fiction. 14-18)"
A girl grows from 6 to 18 on a Kansas farm, methodically trying to fix her mother's mental illness. Read full book review >
EMPIRE OF NIGHT by Kelley Armstrong
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 7, 2015

"Cliffhangers and morbid humor balance out too many plot twists and slow pacing in this unnecessarily complicated sequel. Readers will have to wait for resolution. (Fantasy. 14 & up)"
Twins Moria and Ashyn may have left the Forest, but they aren't out of the woods yet in this romance- and politics-filled sequel to Sea of Shadows (2014).Read full book review >
MISS MAYHEM by Rachel Hawkins
Released: April 7, 2015

"It all seems quite ordinary supernatural stuff until it isn't. (Paranormal romance. 12-18)"
In this sequel to Rebel Belle (2014), the new romance between Harper and David is threatened by their supernatural abilities.Read full book review >
ANASTASIA AND HER SISTERS by Carolyn Meyer
Released: April 7, 2015

"A richly detailed introduction to the tragedy of the last royal family of Russia. (Historical fiction. 13-17)"
Anastasia and her siblings may be kept in ignorance about most of the tragedy and upheaval affecting Russia in the early 20th century, but that doesn't stop them from worrying about the world beyond their daily lives. Read full book review >
PALACE OF LIES by Margaret Peterson Haddix
Released: April 7, 2015

"A welcome return to the Just Ella universe. (Fantasy. 12-18)"
Haddix continues the series that began with the alternate "Cinderella" Just Ella (1999) with a story about a different princess.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >