THE YEAR WE SAILED THE SUN by Theresa Nelson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"Fans of historical fiction will find treasure here in a complex perspective that delivers both a satisfying arc and a desire to know more. (Historical fiction. 9-12)"
Spitfire Julia Delaney is orphaned when her father dies in the gang-ridden Kerry Patch, an Irish neighborhood in 1911 St. Louis. Read full book review >
MOON BEAR by Gill Lewis
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"A moving and memorable tale of a boy and his bear. (Fiction. 9-13)"
Like Nâam-pèng, the bravest bee in a much-loved story, a boy faces a monster—bear-bile farming—and makes a difference. Read full book review >

IF YOU FIND THIS by Matthew Baker
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

" Lively, entertaining and satisfying. (Adventure. 9-12)"
Middle school misfit Nicholas embarks on a wild adventure involving long-lost family heirlooms. Read full book review >
UNDER A PAINTED SKY by Stacey Lee
Released: March 17, 2015

"Emotionally resonant and not without humor, this impressive debut about survival and connection, resourcefulness and perseverance will keep readers on the very edges of their seats. (Historical fiction. 12-16)"
Two girls on the racial margins of mid-19th-century America team up and head west. Read full book review >
PRETTY WANTED by Elisa Ludwig
Released: March 17, 2015

"A satisfying close to this trilogy that began with a clever high school prank and morphed into a full-scale action adventure. (Thriller. 12-18)"
This conclusion of the Pretty Crooked trilogy follows the continuing adventures of Willa and Aidan. Read full book review >

THE WHISPER by Aaron Starmer
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"A riveting, imaginative, disconcerting, inscrutable, unresolved sequel, guaranteed to leave readers anxious for the finale. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
In this sequel to The Riverman (2014), 12-year-old Alistair Cleary travels to a parallel world searching for his missing friend, Fiona.Read full book review >
IN TODD WE TRUST by Louise Galveston
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"Instead of satire, readers get a zany adventure, which would be perfectly satisfactory—if it were zany enough. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
This sequel to By the Grace of Todd (2014) sees the return of the title character and his acolytes.Read full book review >
HOPPER'S DESTINY by Lisa Fiedler
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"Mouse fantasy fans will cheer brave-hearted Hopper's latest adventure. (Animal fantasy. 8-12)"
In this sequel to Mouseheart (2014), warrior mouse Hopper finds himself on the streets of Brooklyn, where he discovers new allies for his efforts to bring peace to the rodents of the subway tunnels.Read full book review >
HYPNOTIZE A TIGER by Calef Brown
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 17, 2015

"With verse and illustrations running the gamut from creative to kooky and occasionally gross, kids should devour this entertaining collection in one sitting. (Poetry. 6-12)"
More nonsense verse from inveterate punster/illustrator Brown. Read full book review >
PUBLIC SCHOOL SUPERHERO by James Patterson
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 16, 2015

"A smart and kind story topped with just the right amount of social justice. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Kenny's dreams of superpowered heroics provide a respite from his tough school. Read full book review >
DREAMS OF FREEDOM by Amnesty International UK Section
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 15, 2015

"With proceeds going to Amnesty International, this album provides much food for thought for those children—and adults—who take the time to contemplate its pages. (Picture book. 5-12)"
Twenty artists from around the world illustrate many aspects of the concept of "freedom," accompanying inspirational sayings from thinkers living and dead. Read full book review >
PRISON BOY by Sharon E. McKay
Released: March 15, 2015

"Another gut-wrenching tale from McKay (War Brothers, 2014, etc.) focusing on children victimized by war and poverty. (Fiction. 12-14)"
What chances have abandoned children to survive the hazards of life on the mean streets of an unnamed developing country riven by civil war? Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >