BAD GUYS by Andrew  Glass
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"The zesty telling makes the eight figures as fascinating as their mythology; the illustrations are as rough-hewn as the stories are polished, with characters and caricatures melding into portraits of the colorful folk who remain part of the cultural fabric. (Picture book/biography. 8-12)"
In a book subtitled "True Stories of Legendary Gunslingers, Sidewinders, Fourflushers, Drygulchers, Bushwhackers, Freebooters, and Downright Bad Guys and Gals of the Wild West," Glass (The Sweetwater Run, 1996, etc.) endeavors to set the record straight concerning the doings of Jesse James, Black Bart, and other desperados who had their sorry reputations burnished by an Eastern press anxious for bold stories from the Wild West. Read full book review >
THE SKIN I'M IN by Sharon Flake
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"A serviceable debut featuring a main character who grows in clearly composed stages. (Fiction. 11-13)"
A timid seventh grader finds the mettle to shake some bad companions in this patchy esteem-builder from Flake. Read full book review >

ON DIFFERENT SHORES by Jen McVeity
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Tess's growing awareness of her dad's imperfections and his realization of his own shortcomings make the ending not only happy, but believable. (Fiction. 12-14)"
A touching novel about the conflicts that arise in a "combined" family after a divorce, and a teen's growing realization and acceptance of her father's imperfections. Read full book review >
HALINKA by Mirjam Pressler
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"An unwieldy cast inhabits the sketchily laid-out post-WWII setting. (Fiction. 11-13)"
A book, a friend, and a piece of sculpture put small cracks in the shell that an abused Polish-German foster child has built around herself, but Pressler allows only very observant readers to glimpse the hurt that shell was built to contain. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"A great and thorough work. (b&w photos, reproductions, maps, chronology, notes, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
This well-written book guides readers through the history of the Louisiana Purchase, from Napoleon's desire to regain the province of Louisiana for the French, to the territory's purchase by the US under President Thomas Jefferson. Read full book review >

FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"With such shaky internal logic, the story collapses under its own weight. (Fiction. 12-14)"
An Ohio teenager abandons family and home to bring an escaped slave's baby to freedom in this handwringer_told in letters and diary entries_from Ayres (Family Tree, 1997, etc.). Read full book review >
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Letters, journals, and other primary and secondary source materials have been spun into a compelling narrative that will capture readers' imaginations, while Ohlsson's black-and-white sketches bring the personalities to the page. (Fiction. 8-12)"
In a work of historical fictional, Abigail Carter narrates how she and her younger sister, Sophia, were the first students in the first school for blind children in America. Read full book review >
THE OTHER SHEPARDS by Adele Griffin
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"A brighter fate for the girls is promised, but whether this devastated family has a real happy ending isn't answered in these pages. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Griffin (Sons of Liberty, 1997, etc.) peeks into the lives of two sisters, eighth-grader Holland and sixth-grader Geneva Shepard, who live in the shadow of three older siblings killed 18 years ago—before Holland and Geneva were born. Read full book review >
THE OTHER SIDE by Angela Johnson
POETRY
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Illustrated with family snapshots, this bittersweet volume will catch the heart of any reader who believes that growing up means leaving home behind. (Poetry. 10-14)"
Johnson (Gone From Home, p. 1036, etc.) offers a collection of poems that comprise a single, intricate story of the town of Shorter, Alabama, a place she "loved and hated." Read full book review >
THE EMPRESS OF ELSEWHERE by Theresa Nelson
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Nevertheless, Nelson (Earthshine, 1994, etc.) ensures that the action never falters, and the rush toward resolution will grip readers. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Jim's dog has just died, and his best friend, Danny, has moved out of town, but the day the book opens takes an unusual turn when a flurry of girls run by, chasing a monkey. Read full book review >
EDITH SHAY by A. LaFaye
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"With so many other fledglings, from Katherine Paterson's Lyddie (1991) to the young artist in Joann Mazzio's Leaving Eldorado (1993), facing first flights over far harsher terrain, this junket seems too easy. (Fiction. 11-13)"
An abandoned suitcase pushes a Wisconsin farm girl with a yen for travel out of the nest in this bland post_Civil War story from LaFaye (The Year of the Sawdust Man, p. 740). Read full book review >
JOEY PIGZA SWALLOWED THE KEY by Jack Gantos
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Mature readers will find this harsh tale softened by unusual empathy and leavened by genuinely funny events. (Fiction. 11-13)"
If Rotten Ralph were a boy instead of a cat, he might be Joey, the hyperactive hero of Gantos's new book, except that Joey is never bad on purpose. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >