DREAM A LITTLE DREAM by Kerstin Gier
Released: April 14, 2015

"While it's less compelling than her Ruby Red Trilogy, fans should enjoy Gier's latest chilling, unresolved tale of sinister dreams and budding romance. (Fantasy. 12-17)"
A teen who loves secrets finds herself in the dreams of four handsome guys at her posh London school in this first volume of the Silver Trilogy. Read full book review >
ZEROBOXER by Fonda Lee
Released: April 8, 2015

"Top-notch science fiction and a great sports novel too. (Science fiction. 12-18)"
Boxing gets an upgrade to zero gravity in this futuristic outing. Read full book review >

FIRST FLIGHT AROUND THE WORLD by Tim Grove
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"A high spot in aviation history, particularly noteworthy for the rugged perseverance of those who achieved it. (endnotes, summary charts, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 10-13)"
An epic feat from an era in which radio was still newfangled and many people "had never seen an airplane, except in pictures." Read full book review >
THE LOST MARBLE NOTEBOOK OF FORGOTTEN GIRL & RANDOM BOY by Marie Jaskulka
Released: April 7, 2015

"Graceful. Searing. Haunting. (Verse fiction. 12-17)"
Trying to escape their broken worlds, two teens fall in love with devastating results. Read full book review >
ONE THING STOLEN by Beth Kephart
Released: April 7, 2015

"Disturbing, sometimes unsettling and ultimately offering a sliver of hope, this effort rivetingly captures the destructive effects of mental and physical illness on a likable, sweet-natured teen. (Fiction. 11-18)"
Something very bad is happening to 17-year-old Nadia. Read full book review >

Released: April 7, 2015

"A deliciously informative, engaging and sweeping chronicle of one of the most popular treats in the world. (timeline, bibliography, websites) (Nonfiction. 12-18)"
Stories of ancient cultures, religion, conquest, slavery, privilege, invention, medicine, culinary experimentation, science and more are all confected together in this flavorful, richly textured historical chronicle of chocolate. Read full book review >
CHANGERS by T. Cooper
Released: April 7, 2015

"A mixed bag plotwise, but Oryon's humor and insight will keep readers turning pages. (Science fiction. 12-18)"
The body-swapping Changer who spent her freshman year of high school as Drew (Changers: Drew, 2014) now spends his sophomore year as Oryon.Read full book review >
DON'T STAY UP LATE by R.L. Stine
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 7, 2015

"Despite a strong start, the book doesn't stick the landing, but it's still suitably scary for fans. (Horror. 10-14)"
A teen babysitter encounters monstrous demons as the nightmares on Fear Street continue. Read full book review >
WHEN YOU LEAVE by Monica Ropal
Released: April 7, 2015

"One great big whodontcare. (Mystery. 11-14)"
A skater girl-turned-private school coed investigates the death of her two-week-old hookup in this debut. Read full book review >
SIMON VS. THE HOMO SAPIENS AGENDA by Becky Albertalli
Released: April 7, 2015

"Funny, moving and emotionally wise. (Fiction. 12-18)"
A gay teen comes out to friends, family and classmates after his secret correspondence with another boy is discovered. Read full book review >
THE QUEEN OF BRIGHT AND SHINY THINGS by Ann Aguirre
Released: April 7, 2015

"This one's strictly for fans of lightweight romance. (Fiction. 12­-16)"
Sage is known around school as Princess Post-it for her efforts to cheer others up by sticking anonymous compliments on their lockers. Read full book review >
THE DETECTIVE'S ASSISTANT by Kate Hannigan
Released: April 7, 2015

"A rousing fictional account of the remarkable career of a pioneering woman. (author's note, sources, further reading) (Historical fiction. 9-12)"
In 1859 Chicago, 11-year-old orphaned Nell strives to make herself indispensable to her mysterious aunt. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Mona Eltahawy
April 28, 2015

In her debut book, Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution, Egyptian-American journalist and commentator Mona Eltahawy mounts an angry indictment of the treatment of women throughout the Arab world. Born in Egypt, she spent her childhood in London, moving with her family to Saudi Arabia when she was 15. Her shock was immediate and visceral: “It felt as though we’d moved to another planet whose inhabitants fervently wished women did not exist,” she recalls. Women could not travel, work or even go to a doctor’s appointment without male approval. We talk to Eltahawy this week on Kirkus TV about her arresting new book. View video >