Released: March 19, 2001

"Fascinating. (suggested reading, glossary, dinosaur dictionary, index) (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
What kind of parent was Tyrannosaurus rex? Read full book review >
WILDFLOWERS AROUND THE YEAR by Hope Ryden
NATURE
Released: March 19, 2001

"While more useful for browsing than for research (there is no index), this is sure to be enjoyed by nature lovers and great for quick identification of something lovely. (bibliography) (Nonfiction. 10-12)"
A beautiful browsing book of wildflower photos and meandering reminiscences by the author of Wild Horses I Have Known (1999) and other books on nature. Read full book review >

CLAY by Colby Rodowsky
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 13, 2001

A powerful novel explores the toll that abduction by a non-custodial parent takes on one girl's identity. Read full book review >
MOONPIE AND IVY by Barbara O’Connor
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 7, 2001

"But she has learned to hope, and that is no small thing for her—and the reader—to carry away. (Fiction. 10-14)"
The twin challenges of loving and being loved form the theme of another Southern gem from the author of Me and Rupert Goody (1999). Read full book review >
WALT WHITMAN by Milton Meltzer
BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 1, 2001

"A worthy tribute. (Biography. 10-14)"
Walt Whitman is a rich subject for biography: a long and peripatetic life; jobs that ranged from schoolteacher to printer to Civil War hospital nurse; famed as a journalist, essayist, and above all as a poet. Read full book review >

HEY YOU! C’MERE by Elizabeth Swados
POETRY
Released: March 1, 2001

"Thick impasto colors and geometric forms take kinetic shape as the cast of characters, their props (don't miss the multilayered ice cream cones), and the architecture of fire escapes and sidewalks take the stage. (Poetry. 8-12)"
In a burnished urban landscape full of the colors of summer, a group of youngsters gather. Read full book review >
THE CIVIL WAR AT SEA by George Sullivan
FRIENDS AND SCHOOL
Released: March 1, 2001

"He also profiles the careers of Matthew Brady and several less well-known photographers, adding another level of interest to a multi-stranded survey. (source notes, index) (Nonfiction. 10-13)"
In this companion to Portraits of War: Civil War Photographers and Their Work (1998), Sullivan presents an album of the prominent ships and men who fought on both sides, matched to an engrossing account of the war's progress: at sea, on the Mississippi, and along the South's well-defended coastline. Read full book review >
Released: March 1, 2001

"A great read, sure to appeal to middle-school readers. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Fourteen-year-old Emily Shepherd's life has just gotten better: she and her family have moved away from the school where Emily was ostracized for a facial scar sustained many years ago. Read full book review >
ROWAN AND THE KEEPER OF THE CRYSTAL by Emily Rodda
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Rowan's inner (if not outer) stature grows in each stand-alone episode of this well-founded series. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Lowly herdboy Rowan (Rowan and the Travelers, 2001, etc.) saves his people yet again in this suspenseful, clever third outing. Read full book review >
GREEN BOY by Susan Cooper
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 2001

"The issue of the resort is all too easily resolved; the narrator veers into an adult voice in places; and Lou comes across not as a credible seven-year-old but as a literary device. (Fiction. 9-12)"
An environmental message overwhelms the plot in this disappointing time-travel story. Read full book review >
ANNE FRANK AND ME by Cherie Bennet
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"For a much better time-travel novel involving the Holocaust, stick with Jane Yolen's The Devil's Arithmetic. (timeline) (Fiction. 11-16)"
In this example of history- and literature-lite, teens are given a rather heavy-handed lesson about the evils of the Holocaust. Read full book review >
DAUGHTER OF VENICE by Donna Jo Napoli
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 2001

"While readers will be rightly skeptical at Donata's speedy mastery of not only written Venetian but Latin as well, they will nevertheless find themselves absorbed in her story and the snapshot of her city that it provides. (Fiction. 10-15)"
Compelling historical fiction explores the Byzantine rules governing the social order of 16th-century Venice. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >