DOG EAT DOG by Jake Marcionette
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 31, 2015

"Jake Mathews' 'AWESOMENESS' is legit, and fans will be clamoring for more. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Wunderkind Marcionette returns with another tale about his gifted preteen, Just Jake (2014). Read full book review >
THE LOST TRACK OF TIME by Paige Britt
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 31, 2015

"Not as masterful as Juster's genre-defining work but enjoyable on many levels. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
An overscheduled girl falls into a hole in her schedule in Britt's whimsical debut. Read full book review >

THE WORLD WITHIN by Jane Eagland
Released: March 31, 2015

"Despite liberties, this is more educational than entertaining and is best suited to fans of the Brontës or biographic celebrations of tortured 19th-century authors. (Historical fiction. 12-18)"
A girl runs wild and writes furiously in this portrait of author Emily Brontë's early years. Read full book review >
THE GIRL WITH THE GLASS BIRD by Esme Kerr
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 31, 2015

"A fine mystery that will keep readers engaged until the final, scary reveal—and leave them eager for the next volume in the series. (Mystery. 11-14)"
After watching her vicious cousin kill her pet goldfish—and cook it!—orphan Edie is more than willing to be sent to a girls' boarding school to act as a spy. Read full book review >
THE SWEETEST HEIST IN HISTORY by Octavia Spencer
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 31, 2015

"Good sleuthing fun supported by compelling character arcs. (spy tips, crafts, recipes) (Mystery. 8-12)"
Deer Creek's middle school ninja detectives of The Case of the Time-Capsule Bandit (2013) take on crime in New York City. Read full book review >

PLAYING A PART by Daria Wilke
Released: March 31, 2015

"A lovely, moving novel with a bittersweet conclusion. (Fiction. 12-18)"
A boy raised by his parents in a Moscow puppet theater faces the ugliness of homophobia as one of the actors, who is gay, decides to leave Russia for the Netherlands in order to escape it. Read full book review >
THE KIDNEY HYPOTHETICAL by Lisa Yee
Released: March 31, 2015

"Smart, funny-but-ruthless teens and self-absorbed, grieving adults prove to be enormously appealing. (Fiction. 13-18)"
A perfect, glowing ending to a stellar high school career veers off course when debate-team captain Higgs Boson flunks girlfriend Roo's easy question: If she needed a kidney, would he give her one? Read full book review >
WHAT WAITS IN THE WOODS by Kieran Scott
Released: March 31, 2015

"Readers will be kept up late, shocked to discover the depth of the darkness that lies in the woods. (Suspense. 12-18)"
A camping trip turns deadly for a group of friends as a cackling stalker creeps among the trees, waiting for the perfect moment to strike. Read full book review >
BACKLASH by Sarah Darer Littman
Released: March 31, 2015

"More conceptual than distinct, but accessible and potentially useful. (author's note) (Fiction. 12-16)"
Cyberbullying and a suicide attempt, told from four first-person perspectives. Read full book review >
PIECES AND PLAYERS by Blue Balliett
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 31, 2015

"Brain-teasing adventure for thinking kids. (author's notes) (Mystery. 8-12)"
Thirteen-year-old amateur sleuths and best friends Tommy Segovia, Calder Pillay and Petra Andalee join forces with two new junior detectives to tackle a shocking art robbery at a Chicago museum in this sequel to The Calder Game (2010).Read full book review >
THE START OF ME AND YOU by Emery Lord
Released: March 31, 2015

"A sweet story about forging an identity beyond tragedy. (Fiction. 12-18)"
Life doesn't have to be defined by death, but try telling that to sympathetic strangers. Read full book review >
GET MOONED by Chris Pallace
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 30, 2015

"Those in search of a humorous, high-interest title that will especially appeal to boys need look no further—and a projected sequel will continue the madcap adventures. (Adventure. 8-12)"
Meet Joey and Johnny—two students at Kick Foot Academy, "the world's premier ninja school," who are as irreverent, bumbling and hilarious as they come. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >