THE JOURNEY by Francesca Sanna
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A necessary, artful, and searing story. (author's note) (Picture book. 4-12)"
A timely, powerful picture book about refugees. Read full book review >
JACK DEATH by M.L. Windsor
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Comfortably familiar and well-executed series tropes make this funny romp one readers will want a sequel to. (Fantasy. 10-13)"
Death's 10-year-old son and a risky new friend take on a cabal of genocidal racists in this lighthearted debut. Read full book review >

ANOTHER ME by Eva Wiseman
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Readers will need the Kleenex for this one. (author's note, glossary) (Historical fiction. 12-16)"
The bubonic plague brings added misery and death to European Jews. Read full book review >
THE HOLOCAUST by Philip Steele
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"An uninspired, unnecessary, superficial treatment of a critically important subject. (photos, maps, glossary, photo credits, index) (Nonfiction. 11-13)"
Arresting visuals are the distinguishing feature of this introduction to the Holocaust for middle graders. Read full book review >
THE BOMBS THAT BROUGHT US TOGETHER by Brian Conaghan
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Charlie's cleareyed account delivers a powerful anti-war statement without a hint of pedantry.(Fiction. 10-14)"
All things considered, Charlie had been having a pretty good summer. Read full book review >

CLASS ELECTION by Neil Swaab
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Even readers with no political aspirations can pick up several useful cons. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Middle school hustler Max Corrigan ups his game to manage a hard-fought campaign for class president. Read full book review >
POCKET CHANGE by Michelle Mulder
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Ambitious in scope and mission but uneven in execution; nevertheless, valuable in its illustration of alternative models of commerce. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
A serious recalibration of our consumerist lifestyle is in order according to Mulder in this valiant attempt to historically situate an economic practice run amok. Read full book review >
THE MIGHTY ODDS by Amy Ignatow
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Hilarious and revealing, this series opener is a must-have. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Ignatow turns on its head the classic middle school good kids-vs.-the populars/bullies trope. Read full book review >
THE EVIL WIZARD SMALLBONE by Delia Sherman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Fans of fantasy will be captivated—and hoping for a sequel. (Fantasy. 9-13)"
It is an enduring, unforgiving Maine winter when 12-year-old runaway Nick Reynaud seeks shelter on a frigid night by knocking on the door of small-town evil wizard Zachariah Smallbone. Read full book review >
GHOSTS by Raina Telgemeier
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Telgemeier's bold colors, superior visual storytelling, and unusual subject matter will keep readers emotionally engaged and unable to put down this compelling tale. (Graphic fiction. 8-12)"
Catrina narrates the story of her mixed-race (Latino/white) family's move from Southern California to Bahía de la Luna on the Northern California coast. Read full book review >
DARK HORSES by Cecily von Ziegesar
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A soap-operatic blend of Romeo and Juliet and My Friend Flicka. Yikes. (Fiction. 12-16)"
A troubled teen finds her temporary soul mate in a troubled horse. Read full book review >
THE LITTLEST BIGFOOT by Jennifer Weiner
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Enchanting right up to the sequel-beckoning end. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
Two girls, one a human and one a Yare, or Bigfoot, feel that they don't fit in with their families and communities. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >