THE MYSTERY OF HOLLOW PLACES by Rebecca Podos
Released: Jan. 26, 2016

"This heartfelt and page-turning debut introduces readers to a whip-smart and wise heroine. (Mystery. 13-18)"
The daughter of a bestselling mystery author turns to her favorite literary sleuths for inspiration to find her missing father. Read full book review >
THE YEAR WE FELL APART by Emily Martin
Released: Jan. 26, 2016

"For readers who crave drama. (Fiction. 13-17)"
Reeling from a reputation-staining episode the previous spring and the news that her mother has breast cancer, Harper is ready to patch things up with Declan, the boyfriend she dumped last fall. Read full book review >

UP TO THIS POINTE by Jennifer Longo
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"A moving love letter to dance, dreams, and San Francisco, and a look at how embracing personal passion leads to fulfillment (even if it wasn't part of the plan). (Fiction. 12-18)"
Six months in an isolated Antarctic research station give Harper, a recent high school graduate, time to reflect and heal after the painful end of her ballet aspirations. Read full book review >
A TINY PIECE OF SKY by Shawn K. Stout
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"Successfully warmhearted and child-centered. (Historical fiction. 9-13)"
As her favorite sister heads off to Aunt Dottie's farm, Frankie Baum expects her own summer of 1939 to be dull, but her father's new restaurant creates an unexpected widening of her world. Read full book review >
THE RADIANT ROAD by Katherine Catmull
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"Fewer words would have made a better story. (Fantasy. 12-16)"
A 15-year-old American girl and a half-fairy Irish boy fight to save the gate to the fairies' world. Read full book review >

WITCH WARS by Sibéal Pounder
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"A sweet little magical tale with at least one sequel on the way. (Paranormal comedy. 8-12)"
A girl dives down a drainpipe to discover a world of witches, and everybody there thinks she's one too. Read full book review >
SHADE ME by Jennifer Brown
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"An intense, often exasperating, sometimes-thrilling series opener. (Thriller. 12-18)"
An 18-year-old girl decides to investigate an attempted murder on her own. Read full book review >
SWORD AND VERSE by Kathy MacMillan
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"Kudos for a fresh take on a fraught topic but not for derailing slavery into a vehicle for romantic angst. (Fantasy. 12-18)"
Literacy becomes the key to liberation in a thoughtful debut fantasy. Read full book review >
FRIDAY BARNES, GIRL DETECTIVE by R.A. Spratt
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"Delightful, highly logical, and well-informed fun. (Mystery. 8-12)"
She's only 11, but she's smarter and better informed than most adults, and she's determined to solve mysteries for a living. Read full book review >
HENRY CICADA'S EXTRAORDINARY ELKTONIUM ESCAPADE by David Teague
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"Whimsy gone wrong. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
Henry Cicada's dream is to be ordinary and unnoticed, but he learns that sometimes being yourself is much better than being invisible. Read full book review >
THE CAPTURE by Tom Isbell
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"Heroics, bravery, and action don't compensate for serious implausibility issues. (Post-apocalyptic adventure. 13-17)"
The escaped Less Thans and Sisters from The Prey (2015) return to rescue those left behind.Read full book review >
SECRETS OF VALHALLA by Jasmine Richards
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"The combination of adventure, appealing characters, and high stakes should satisfy middle-grade fantasy fans. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Two unlikely preteens battle the gods of Norse mythology to save their world from Ragnarok—chaos and destruction. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >