BUTTON HILL by Michael Bradford
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 1, 2015

"Rare, scary fun. With tomatoes. (Horror. 11-13)"
A moment's messing with an odd clock plunges a lad into the strange and dangerous borderland between the living world and the realms of the dead in this decidedly offbeat chiller. Read full book review >
PUNCH LIKE A GIRL by Karen Krossing
Released: April 1, 2015

"A fast-paced book about healing through helping others, speaking up and physical self-defense. (Fiction. 13-15)"
Unable to speak of her assault, a 17-year-old girl begins acting out. Read full book review >

THE CONFORMITY by John Hornor Jacobs
Released: April 1, 2015

"A finale that requires homework of its readers. (Supernatural thriller. 13-15)"
Telekinesis, flying teens, reinhabited bodies, giants and more: The Society of Extranaturals returns for the conclusion to the Twelve-Fingered Boy trilogy. Read full book review >
TERRORIST by Henrik Rehr
Released: April 1, 2015

"Princip, in this contemplative version of history, isn't evil, and he isn't heroic. He's just a hapless man who fired a gun. (Graphic historical fiction. 12-18)"
Graphic novelist Rehr offers a fictionalized biography of Gavrilo Princip, who killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand and started World War I. Read full book review >
WHISTLE-BLOWERS by Matt Doeden
Released: April 1, 2015

"A keen challenge to received opinions for high schoolers to chew long and hard upon. (Nonfiction. 13-18)"
Doeden makes the effort here to bring whistleblowing out of the seamy shadows and describe its role. Read full book review >

CYBER ATTACK by Martin Gitlin
Released: April 1, 2015

"A bare-bones introduction for readers without a pre-existing interest. (source notes, bibliography, further reading, index) (Nonfiction. 12-14)"
A quick history of hacking, from the "phone phreaks" of the 1960s to today's attacks on commercial data stores large and small. Read full book review >
DOG EAT DOG by Jake Marcionette
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 31, 2015

"Jake Mathews' 'AWESOMENESS' is legit, and fans will be clamoring for more. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Wunderkind Marcionette returns with another tale about his gifted preteen, Just Jake (2014). Read full book review >
THE LOST TRACK OF TIME by Paige Britt
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 31, 2015

"Not as masterful as Juster's genre-defining work but enjoyable on many levels. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
An overscheduled girl falls into a hole in her schedule in Britt's whimsical debut. Read full book review >
THE WORLD WITHIN by Jane Eagland
Released: March 31, 2015

"Despite liberties, this is more educational than entertaining and is best suited to fans of the Brontës or biographic celebrations of tortured 19th-century authors. (Historical fiction. 12-18)"
A girl runs wild and writes furiously in this portrait of author Emily Brontë's early years. Read full book review >
THE GIRL WITH THE GLASS BIRD by Esme Kerr
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 31, 2015

"A fine mystery that will keep readers engaged until the final, scary reveal—and leave them eager for the next volume in the series. (Mystery. 11-14)"
After watching her vicious cousin kill her pet goldfish—and cook it!—orphan Edie is more than willing to be sent to a girls' boarding school to act as a spy. Read full book review >
THE SWEETEST HEIST IN HISTORY by Octavia Spencer
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 31, 2015

"Good sleuthing fun supported by compelling character arcs. (spy tips, crafts, recipes) (Mystery. 8-12)"
Deer Creek's middle school ninja detectives of The Case of the Time-Capsule Bandit (2013) take on crime in New York City. Read full book review >
PLAYING A PART by Daria Wilke
Released: March 31, 2015

"A lovely, moving novel with a bittersweet conclusion. (Fiction. 12-18)"
A boy raised by his parents in a Moscow puppet theater faces the ugliness of homophobia as one of the actors, who is gay, decides to leave Russia for the Netherlands in order to escape it. Read full book review >

Upcoming Kirkus Interview

April 28, 2015
Mona Eltahawy

In her debut book, Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution, Egyptian-American journalist and commentator Mona Eltahawy mounts an angry indictment of the treatment of women throughout the Arab world. Born in Egypt, she spent her childhood in London, moving with her family to Saudi Arabia when she was 15. Her shock was immediate and visceral: “It felt as though we’d moved to another planet whose inhabitants fervently wished women did not exist,” she recalls. Women could not travel, work or even go to a doctor’s appointment without male approval. We talk to Eltahawy this week on Kirkus TV about her arresting new book.