Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"This may not be the only book you'll need on these writers— for one thing, their quirks get more attention than their works— but you'll have to look far to find a better first one. (Biography. 10-14)"
Another colorful, enthralling excursion into our cultural heritage from the author and illustrator of Lives of the Musicians (1993). Read full book review >
GOLD STAR SISTER by Claire Rudolf Murphy
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Despite the interesting WW II history, Murphy (To the Summit, 1992, etc.) delivers an essentially flat story that only picks up a little at the tear-jerky end. (Fiction. 10- 14)"
Carrie receives a C in History because she handed in an unfinished project on WW II—she really hadn't cared enough to complete it. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"This one is, and doesn't. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
``Politics ought to be fun—after baseball it's our next favorite pastime,'' says Texas Gov. Read full book review >
FICTION
Released: Aug. 15, 1994

"These tales are not so much scary as contrived and the b&w illustrations that accompany them are crude and ugly. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Hapless travelers are turned to wood, a doll house weeps in the middle of the night, a young woman is transformed into a puppy, and a little girl's life is saved by the spirit of her great-grandmother in this hateful collection of nine mystery/horror tales. Read full book review >
SEVEN SPIDERS SPINNING by Gregory Maguire
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 15, 1994

"A fast, delightfully entertaining romp. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A lighthearted fantasy that, while easily read, is as intricately structured as a spider's web. Read full book review >

STILL MORE STORIES TO SOLVE by George Shannon
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Accessible, wise, and richly humorous. (Folk Tales. 9-12)"
Akbar the Emperor draws a line across the floor and challenges his jester Birbal to make it shorter without erasing anything. Read full book review >
BRANFORD MARSALIS by Bob Bernotas
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"End notes; index; source list; chronology and discography (through early 1994); 12 full-page b&w photos (not seen). (Biography. 12-15)"
A dry but serviceable look at the career of the oldest Marsalis brother, currently enjoying an enviable gig as musical director of the Tonight show. Read full book review >
WAIT AND SEE by Virginia Bradley
FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Too many promising themes go undeveloped here; still, enjoyable light fiction. (Fiction. 10- 12)"
When Grandpa's housekeeper, Doff, must return to England to care for her aged mother, the change is almost impossible for Amy to accept; her parents died when she was a baby, and affectionate, sensible Doff has always cared for her. Read full book review >
THE GATHERING by Isobelle Carmody
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Fans of the horror genre will find this Australian novelist's US debut uneven but promising. (Fiction. 12-15)"
When Evil returns to the town of Cheshunt after many years, five teenagers with troubled pasts form a Chain to combat it. Read full book review >
NONFICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Source notes; glossary; further reading; index. (Nonfiction. 12-16)"
In the Landmark Supreme Court Cases series, a well-crafted history of the school-desegregation cases, the main effort of civil rights activity in the early 1950s. Read full book review >
TRAVELING BACKWARD by Toby Forward
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Illustrations unseen. (Fiction 8-12)"
Fanny's Grandpa is dying and her house is filled with the obnoxious relatives who expect to be remembered in his will. Read full book review >
ZOE'S GIFT by Sheila Hayes
FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Though not particularly well-constructed, and certainly predictable, this may appeal to fans of the genre. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Cory's archaeologist parents decide to leave her with their mentor's granddaughter in England while the three adults go off on a dig. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >