GATHERING THE DEW by Minfong Ho
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 2003

"The author takes on this shocking slice of world history with the appropriate amount of detail and sensitivity for a young audience, but the difficult subject matter makes it better suited for more mature readers. (Fiction. 11-15)"
In this historical first-person narrative, Nakri Sokha, a 12-year-old girl living in the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh in 1975, has her world shattered overnight. Read full book review >
FINDING ZOLA by Marianne Mitchell
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2003

"Run-of-the-mill mystery writing for fans of the simple solution. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Intriguing clues and danger signs abound in a mystery in which a strong, upbeat teenager has every reason to be down, but pushes through her mourning and guilt to detect her way through to the finish. Read full book review >

NATURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"Intriguing and enriching. (extensive index) (Nonfiction. 10-13)"
Outstanding science writing and impressive scholarship make this a first choice for science enthusiasts. Read full book review >
THE WISHING BONE by Stephen Mitchell
POETRY
Released: March 1, 2003

"A handsomely packaged, nicely diverse gathering of words and art. (Poetry. 9-13)"
Plainly channeling Edward Lear and maybe Lewis Carroll too, Mitchell (Hans Christian Andersen's Nightingale, illus. by Bagram Ibatoulline, 2002, etc.) offers nine rhymed ruminations, daffy episodes, and glimpses of imaginary wildlife, all illustrated, and sometimes illuminated, by Pohrt's (The Tomb of the Boy King, 2001, etc.) small, clean-lined, delicately exact figures. Read full book review >
SHAKESPEARE BATS CLEANUP by Ron Koertge
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2003

"Kevin's mix of lame and not-so-lame poems effectively convey realistic learning and recovery curves—and may also plant the idea in receptive readers that it's okay for guys to write. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Koertge (Brimstone Journals, 2001, etc.) joins the ever-swelling ranks of writers experimenting with novels-in-verse with this journal of a teenaged jock who develops a taste for writing poetry while laid up with mono. Read full book review >

ATALANTA AND THE ARCADIAN BEAST by Jane Yolen
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"An afterword discusses which elements come from Greek literature and which the authors created for this entertaining adventure with its strong heroine. (Fiction. 9-13)"
In their third entry in the "Young Heroes" series, Yolen and Harris (Hippolyta and the Curse of the Amazons, 2002, etc.) craft another fast-paced historical novel set in ancient Greece. Read full book review >
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE’S TWELFTH NIGHT by Bruce Coville
Released: March 1, 2003

"Prospective audiences or cast members will get a clear sense of the play's tangled plot from this, but will have to see it performed to fully appreciate its sheer hilarity and joyful climax. (Picture book. 9-12)"
Coville, who's done so well with these in the past (Romeo and Juliet, 1999, etc), prefaces his latest Shakespearean retelling with the claim that its themes of trying on a new identity and having to yearn in silence for another will carry particular resonance for young readers as "the struggle of adolescence in microcosm!" Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2003

"Fascinating. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
The familiar starling, gypsy moth, and kudzu vine are all alien to North America, wreaking havoc on established plant and animal ecosystems and threatening biodiversity. Read full book review >
MILLIONS TO MEASURE by David M. Schwartz
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: March 1, 2003

"The Schwartz-Kellogg team has got it right again: this should be part of every professional's collection. (Picture book. 5-12)"
Marvelosissimo the Mathematical Magician returns, this time tackling measurement, in this latest installment of the winning "millions" series (If You Made a Million, 1989, etc.). Read full book review >
TORNADO! by Cynthia Pratt Nicolson
NATURE
Released: March 1, 2003

From the ominous black funnel cloud on the cover, to the harrowing eyewitness accounts and the many slam-bang color photographs of the damage caused by tornadoes, this title grabs the attention of readers fascinated by natural disasters. Read full book review >
HANA’S SUITCASE by Karen Levine
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 2003

In 1998, the director of the newly endowed Tokyo Holocaust Education Resource Center's museum, whose mission is to educate Japanese students about the horrors of the Holocaust, set out to obtain artifacts for display. Read full book review >
PAUL REVERE’S RIDE by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
POETRY
Released: March 1, 2003

"A fine version, although it is not so powerful or engaging as Charles Santore's (below) or the Caldecott Honor-winning marvel by Christopher Bing (2001). (historical note) (Picture book/poetry. 7-12)"
They don't write ‘em like this any more, which is too bad, as Longfellow gave stirring life to a small part of the Revolutionary War and made a silversmith a legend in a poem that has proven extremely popular to illustrators. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Laini Taylor
March 27, 2017

In bestselling YA writer Laini Taylor’s new fantasy novel, Strange the Dreamer, the dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around—and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he's been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance to lose his dream forever. What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving? “Lovers of intricate worldbuilding and feverish romance will find this enthralling,” our critic writes. View video >