ANASTASIA by Carolyn Meyer
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Both biography lovers and fiction readers alike will gobble it up. (historical note, family tree, and other endnotes, photos, cast of characters) (Fiction. 9-14)"
Immensely readable and interesting, this fictive diary of Anastasia, daughter of Czar Nicholas and Czarina Alexandra, imparts a good deal of history in an entertaining way. Read full book review >
GIVE A BOY A GUN by Todd Strasser
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Important, insightful, and chilling. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Vivid, distressing, and all too real, Strasser's (Close Call, 1999, etc.) latest work of fiction explores the minds and hearts of a group of students, parents, teachers, and community members whose lives are forever altered by a tragic school shooting. Read full book review >

THE GRADUATION OF JAKE MOON by Barbara Park
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Nonetheless, Park has produced a perceptive book that should prove useful to children who must navigate similar waters. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Jake Moon's grandfather Skelly used to be the emotional fixer in Jake's household, the one who soothed his hurts and helped him through hard times. Read full book review >
THE PLAYMAKER by J.B. Cheaney
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"It might be read as a companion to Gary Blackwood's The Shakespeare Stealer (1998). (Fiction. 11-13)"
In a mystery set in Elizabethan London, 14-year-old Richard Malory joins Shakespeare's theater company and discovers a Catholic plot against the queen. Read full book review >
THE BLACK SOLDIER by Catherine Clinton
FRIENDS AND SCHOOL
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Its subject matter is an important and often neglected part of American history. (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
Clinton (I, Too, Sing America: Three Centuries of African American Poetry, 1998, etc.) tells the history of black soldiers who fought for their country and struggled for equality in the armies in which they fought. Read full book review >

MEN OF STONE by Gayle Friesen
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Worth a try, but may be a tough sell. (Fiction. 11-14)"
Fifteen-year-old Ben Conrad can't seem to catch a break. Read full book review >
CAVE by Diane Siebert
NONFICTION
Released: Aug. 31, 2000

"Despite shortcomings of the illustration, this is a book that inspires. (Poetry. 10-14)"
This dramatic poem is a majestic tribute to some of the natural forces that shape our world. Read full book review >
GOLD DUST by Chris Lynch
FICTION
Released: Aug. 31, 2000

"But maybe, just maybe, Richard is a bit more aware at the end that others have dreams, too. (Fiction. 11-13)"
The versatile author of Gypsy Davey (1994) and the Blue Eyed Son trilogy weaves a subtle, challenging study of star-crossed friendship. Read full book review >
PLAY TO THE ANGEL by Maurine F. Dahlberg
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 31, 2000

"Unforgettable writing from a first novelist. (Fiction. 8-12)"
It is 1938 and Hitler's plan to annihilate the Jews has just extended into Vienna. Read full book review >
MEMORIES OF SUMMER by Ruth White
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 29, 2000

"Memorable. (Fiction. 10-13)"
When 13-year-old Lyric and 16-year-old Summer move from Glory Bottom, Virginia, to Flint, Michigan, in 1955, life changes for them in ways no one would have expected. Read full book review >
DEATH AT DEVIL’S BRIDGE by Cynthia DeFelice
FICTION
Released: Aug. 28, 2000

"Keeping the reader in the grip of the plot, she explores a teen's use of moral tools in the face of pressures from peers. (Fiction. 10-12)"
DeFelice (Cold Feet, see above, etc.) writes a riveting story of a 13-year-old boy seduced by the thrill of dangerous friendship and, despite good intentions, drawn into the treacherous world of drugs and murder. Read full book review >
DOLL BABY by Eve Bunting
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 21, 2000

"Although Bunting handles the subject matter skillfully and sensitively, it's so obviously neither fish nor fowl that it likely will remain tucked away on a shelf rather than finding its way into the hands of young girls like Ellie. (Fiction. 11-14)"
In keeping with her willingness to take risks, Bunting (The Memory String, see below, etc.) tackles another "difficult" subject in this poignant, but unusual, cross between a picture book and a problem novel. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >