BLUEPRINT by Charlotte Kerner
FICTION
Released: Oct. 17, 2000

"Disturbing and unsettling, this is less a translation of a particular culture than a human face on a question that is intriguing worldwide. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Siri is the daughter/twin of Iris and one of the first cloned beings in this seamless translation of German author Kerner's exploration of the psychological reality for cloned humans. Read full book review >
AT THE SIGN OF THE STAR by Katherine Sturtevant
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 16, 2000

"Oddly, in a book for kids, the books listed in the afterword are all adult books. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Although its feminist message is a bit heavy-handed, this novel, set in 1677, is an engaging and fun story about 12-year-old Meg, the only surviving child of London bookseller Miles Moore. Read full book review >

MATILDA BONE by Karen Cushman
FICTION
Released: Oct. 16, 2000

"But in the end, Matilda herself comes off, as the saints themselves conclude, as a rather tiresome prig whose journey towards self-discovery, while rich in incident, may not hold quite enough overall plot tension to compel every reader. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In a carefully researched novel set in the medieval period, the author of The Midwife's Apprentice (1996 Newbery winner) depicts another vivid heroine, left alone to make her place in the world. Read full book review >
FOUR STUPID CUPIDS by Gregory Maguire
FICTION
Released: Oct. 16, 2000

"Midsummer Night's Dream' this is not, but rarely have the arrows of love gone more hilariously astray. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Having faced ghosts, aliens, and deadly Siberian snow spiders in previous adventures, the fifth graders at Josiah Fawcett Elementary take on a very different sort of challenge when a Grecian urn from Fawn Petros's aunt shatters, releasing four bright-eyed cupids from a 2,300-year nap. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 15, 2000

"Once again, she not only is going to draw strong immediate reactions from young readers, but provides food for longer thought, and deeper responses, to modern art. (Collective biography. 10-14)"
The author of Inspirations (1989) and Visions (1993) perceptively profiles six more female artists, focusing here on photographers—selected less for their fame, than to contrast distinctive styles and sensibilities. Read full book review >

LITTLE WOMEN NEXT DOOR by Sheila Solomon Klass
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 15, 2000

"With a wonderful portrait of the bold, smart, dramatic Louisa, including a look at her 'first book,' the novel will charm readers, whether or not familiar with Little Women; it's also a fine, painless introduction to an influential and characteristically American religious movement. (Fiction. 8-12)"
An engaging, warm-hearted historical novel about farm life, friendship, imagination, and what Transcendentalism looked like to a smart ten-year-old. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Oct. 15, 2000

"The result is a thought-provoking companion to Virginia Hamilton's more story-oriented In the Beginning (1988). (bibliography) (Nonfiction. 11-14)"
"One person's religion is often another's mythology," writes the author. Read full book review >
LOST IN TIME by Hans Magnus Enzensberger
FICTION
Released: Oct. 15, 2000

"Thankfully, he carries home physical evidence to show that it wasn't all a dream, but it's not a particularly meaningful odyssey either, and readers will be left with more questions than answers. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Enzensberger (Number Devil, 1998) sends a German teenager on a long, strange trip into the past that promises more than it delivers. Read full book review >
THE LONGITUDE PRIZE by Joan Dash
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 13, 2000

"Dash's title provides an in-depth look at a little known inventor and his life and times and makes good use of primary sources seldom available to students. (afterword, glossary, timeline, bibliography) (Biography. 12-14)"
John Harrison, an obscure 18th-century carpenter and clockmaker from Yorkshire, solved a problem that had plagued sailors for centuries: how to tell East-West location at sea, thereby avoiding shipwrecks and other costly disasters. Read full book review >
A YEAR DOWN YONDER by Richard Peck
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Year-round fun. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Set in 1937 during the so-called "Roosevelt recession," tight times compel Mary Alice, a Chicago girl, to move in with her grandmother, who lives in a tiny Illinois town so behind the times that it doesn't "even have a picture show." Read full book review >
VENOLA IN LOVE by Cheryl Ware
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Overall, in spite of the interesting format, Venola's story is insipid and uninspiring. (line drawings) (Fiction. 8-12)"
In this sequel to Catty-Cornered (1998), Venola is now in the second half of seventh grade and has become quite boy-crazy. Read full book review >
WHEN I WAS OLDER by Garret Freymann-Weyr
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Freymann-Weyr has crafted a smartly written story that honors both intellect and love while remaining blessedly free of cliché or sugar-coating. (Fiction. 10-15)"
In this exceptional novel about the grief process, Sophie comes through as a unique but very real character. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >