BETWEEN MADISON AND PALMETTO by Jacqueline Woodson
FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"The episodic events don't quite add up to a plot; still, a likable visit with two good friends—whose fine jacket portrait by the Dillons will be a sure hook. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In the third in the trilogy begun with Last Summer with Maizon (1990), the two Brooklyn eighth-graders are attending a private academy. Read full book review >
INVERTEBRATES by Nathan Aaseng
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Not a first choice. (Nonfiction. 12-14)"
In the Venture series, a close look at invertebrates, which comprise more than 95% of all animal species. Read full book review >

AFRICAN ANIMAL TALES by Rogerio Andrade Barbosa
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Afterword from the translator. (Folklore. 9-12)"
Ten fables featuring rivals outsmarted, deftly delivered lessons, and sparkling humor, collected and retold (originally in Portuguese) by a UN worker in Guinea-Bissau. Read full book review >
TICKET TO THE TWENTIES by Mary Blocksma
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A delightful way to absorb a real sense of the era—and a treasure trove for other authors depicting it. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
Entertainingly couched as a topical guide for a kid who's about to stay with a middle-class American family of seven decades ago: a survey of slang, customs, technology, and details of daily life, with plenty of telling practical hints—how to ``use your high-tops to anchor your underwear''; ``Before you come, get your shots'' but ``Come back home for modern medical attention''; ``Watch out for false advertising'' and ``Get out...before October 29, 1929''; or, ``give your seat to an older person.'' Clothing, hair-styles, household routines, food, stores, entertainment, fads, travel, and features like Lindbergh's flight and the status of women and minorities are treated in inviting spreads lightened with cartoon-style art, boxed addenda, ``Twenties Firsts,'' and occasional photos. Read full book review >
A VOICE IN THE WIND by Kathryn Lasky
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Even the Bobbsey twins had more substance. (Fiction. 8-12)"
From a much-honored pro, a disappointingly graceless tale, third in the Starbuck Family Adventures. Read full book review >

EAT THE RIGHT STUFF by Catherine Reef
HEALTH
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Bibliography; index. (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
In the new Good Health Guidelines series, a sensible, middle-of-the-road approach to nutrition. Read full book review >
SALMON STORY by Brenda Z. Guiberson
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Bibliography (lengthy, serious, and varied); index. (Nonfiction. 7-12)"
In the Redfeather series, an easily read yet detailed discussion of the Pacific Northwest's salmon. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Index; large bibliography; several dozen b&w illustrations, mostly contemporary photos. (Nonfiction. 11-15)"
In a follow-up to Undying Glory: The Story of the Massachusetts 54th Regiment (1991), Cox celebrates the essential role played by the 9th and 10th US Cavalry in the Indian Wars. Read full book review >
NONFICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Bibliography; museum list; index. (Nonfiction. 11-13)"
Under a title that's a candidate for most outrageous pun of the year, a respected scholar of children's literature and education celebrates a distinctive style of regional dress. Read full book review >
SOMEONE TO COUNT ON by Patricia Hermes
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Nonetheless, Hermes's storytelling makes an effective hook; steer those who relate to this drama on to MacLachlan's compelling, beautifully crafted Journey (1992). (Fiction. 10-12)"
The author of Mama, Let's Dance (1991) takes readers down yet another rocky road in a story of contemporary restlessness. Read full book review >
WHEN THE RAGMAN SINGS by Judith Logan Lehne
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 30, 1993

"Nonetheless, this is promising debut novel, with a likable, thoughtful protagonist, a vivid (if overdrawn) setting, and fresh, fluent writing touched with real lyricism. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A carefully researched depiction of 1920's Baltimore (bibliography appended), set in a middle-class neighborhood of shops like the dry-goods store run by ten-year-old Dorothea's parents. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 30, 1993

"No index or bibliography; profusely illustrated with b&w photos (not seen). (Biography. 11-13)"
A hard look at the youth and career (up to Terminator 2) of ``the most famous real strong man in history.'' Lipsyte draws connections between the contempt with which young Arnold was treated by his father and the ruthless, bullying competitor he grew to be: fear of being thought weak has fueled his determination to win at any cost. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >