BENNO’S BEAR by N.F. Zucker
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Still, Benno's relationship with Bear will intrigue readers, and the plot offers enough suspense and action to keep readers interested until the sentimental final paragraphs. (Fiction. 10-13)"
In this debut, a young pickpocket gets caught and must deal with the consequences, good as well as bad. Read full book review >
SCORPIO’S CHILD by Kezi Matthews
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Ultimately, superbly realized voice and atmosphere cannot here compensate for flawed plotting. (Fiction. 11-14)"
It's the summer of 1947 in small-town South Carolina, and 14-year-old Afton has a lot to worry about. Read full book review >

A HOLE IN THE WORLD by Sid Hite
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"With more diligent editing, this could have been a well-realized story about grieving and growing up—unfortunately, it isn't. (Fiction. 12-14)"
The legacy of one man's character on his survivors is explored in this Southern coming-of-age tale. Read full book review >
BLISTER by Susan Shreve
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Spunky and resolute, Blister is a character many readers will understand intimately. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A ten-year-old girl goes about the task of re-creating herself when both her parents fail her utterly in this exploration of the backstory of a character first introduced in Shreve's Jonah, the Whale (1998). Read full book review >
FLIGHT OF THE RAVEN by Stephanie S. Tolan
FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Only for committed fans of part one. (Fiction. 10-15)"
A slow-moving sequel to Tolan's Welcome to the Ark (1996) in which Elijah, a young African-American empath who has escaped from a juvenile mental health facility in the Adirondacks, becomes entangled in a domestic terrorist organization. Read full book review >

ALL THE WAY HOME by Patricia Reilly Giff
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Readers will be swept away. (Fiction. 10-12)"
It is the summer of 1941. Read full book review >
MY BROTHER, THE ROBOT by Bonny Becker
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Despite the implausibility of the second half of the story, the text is clever and comical and kids should enjoy it, imperfections and all. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A flawed human child has to cope with a robotic brother who can do no wrong. Read full book review >
RUNNING BACK TO LUDIE by Angela Johnson
POETRY
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Overall, however, this slender offering packs an honest emotional punch. (Fiction/poetry. 10-15)"
A series of spare, linked poems tell the story of a teenage girl's fleeting reunion with the mother who left her many years ago. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

Denenberg constructs the tragedy of Elvis Presley's life in a series of chapters that take their titles from rock and rockabilly songs. Read full book review >
FAIR WEATHER by Richard Peck
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Not up to its promise, but good fun nonetheless. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Into the quiet, routinized farm life of 14-year-old Rosie, older sister Lottie, and younger brother Buster comes a letter from Aunt Euterpe in Chicago, inviting them to the 1893 World's Fair. Read full book review >
THE GOOD DOG by Avi
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Almost wholly absent from the story is a real exploration of the mutual affection that underlies the human-dog relationship; without this, McKinley's decision to stay with his humans rather than follow Lupin is an intellectual, and ultimately unsatisfying, one. (Fiction. 8-12)"
When the wild calls, will this good dog answer? Read full book review >
FLIPPED by Wendelin Van Draanen
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"It is, nevertheless, a highly agreeable romantic comedy tempered with the pointed lesson (demonstrated by the straining of Bryce's parents' marriage) that the 'choices you make now will affect you for the rest of your life.' (Fiction. 10-14)"
Proof that the course of pubescent love never runs smooth. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >