BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"While some of the notions presented are old-fashioned, students will find useful—not only for research purposes—the lessons of how to be a good friend, a good citizen, and a successful businessperson. (appendix, chronology, index) (Anthology. 12-15)"
The core beliefs of the US's founding fathers are presented in this anthology from Bennett (The Book of Virtues for Young People, 1995, etc.), adapted from his Sacred Honor (1997). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"The expertly edited interviews create a glowing portrait of the hard-working, outspoken woman who died in 1988 at the age of 101; the narrative flows, a conversation with the artist about her life that also offers insights into the folk-art style. (b&w photos, bibliography) (Biography. 8-12)"
Lyons (Catching the Fire, 1997, etc.) introduces an extraordinary woman in Clementine Hunter, through careful collages of interviews that present the artist's story in her own words. Read full book review >

ARMAGEDDON SUMMER by Jane Yolen
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Jed and Marina have epiphanies great and small, and they emerge whole, still searching for belief in its myriad aspects, and for each other. (Fiction. 12-15)"
The format—a story told from alternating viewpoints, with a few letters, radio and e-mail transcripts, and other realia thrown in—is becoming familiar, but two practiced writers employ the tactic and run with it in this page-turner. Read full book review >
CAT UP A TREE by Anne Isaacs
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Combining elements both humorous and mystical, Isaacs sends the cat up the tree and transports readers to myriad worlds. (Picture book/poetry. 8-12)"
In a chronicle of the events surrounding a feline's jaunt up a tree, Isaacs (Treehouse Tales, 1997, etc.) delivers a bewitching collection of poetry. Read full book review >
THE GREAT GREEN NOTEBOOK OF KATIE ROBERTS by Amy Hest
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Lamut provides simple but amusing black-and-white line drawings. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A second romp with irrepressible Katie (The Private Notebook of Katie Roberts, 1996) in a small Texas town in the late 1940s. Read full book review >

NINE MAN TREE by Robert Newton Peck
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"The death of Velmer is gory; the tidy ending grates, but this is an exciting story, colorfully told. (Fiction. 10-13)"
In the Florida swamplands during the Depression, a giant, crazed, man-eating boarhog is terrorizing the community. Read full book review >
IF YOU COME SOFTLY by Jacqueline Woodson
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Miah's melodramatic death overshadows a tale as rich in social and personal insight as any of Woodson's previous books. (Fiction. 11-13)"
In a meditative interracial love story with a wrenching climactic twist, Woodson (The House You Pass on the Way, 1997, etc.) offers an appealing pair of teenagers and plenty of intellectual grist, before ending her story with a senseless act of violence. Read full book review >
MEMORY JUG by Patricia Martin
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Despite the drawbacks, Mack is a strong-willed character fighting to open up to the possibilities of new friends and feelings. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Mack Humbel's past holds a recurring theme of loss, for her father died in a fire after saving Mack and her younger sister, Amaryllis; the girls sent him back into the blaze with pleas to save their dog. Read full book review >
ANGELS TURN THEIR BACKS by Margaret Buffie
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"The mystery of the agoraphobic needlepoint artist who died in the house bogs down Addy's story; it is the least compelling element, relayed mostly in the screeching taunts of a very talkative parrot. (Fiction. 12-14)"
On her first day at a new school, Addy, 15, has a panic attack and races out; without understanding what is happening to her, she finds herself unable to leave the safety of her home. Read full book review >
HAUNTED SISTER by Lael Littke
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Lenore accepts that she is a blend of two people, good and bad—is a valiant attempt to bring many ideas together, but the plotting overwhelms Littke (Blue Skye, 1991, etc.); wavering between full-blown grotesque and moments of deep feeling, her story gets lost in the middle. (Fiction. 12-14)"
A tale of twins—one dead, one alive—becomes an ineffective hybrid: part ghost story, part multiple-personality yarn, part romance. Read full book review >
THE MOONSTONES by Jean Thesman
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"It's a step back for Thesman (The Storyteller's Daughter, 1997, etc.), who shows better skills and a surer hand with character in all her previous novels. (Fiction. 11-13)"
A contrived romance/mystery with an anticlimactic ending and exaggerated, two-dimensional characters. Read full book review >
HOMESTEADING by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Such contrasts do not further the text, and, with pictures of modern gardens and close-ups of onions and gourds, detract from the compelling historical information. (map, index) (Nonfiction. 10-12)"
After the Homestead Act of 1862 and its offer of 160 acres of prairie land for $18.00 and five years of labor, men and women by the thousands took up the challenge and moved onto the prairie. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >