BAT 6 by Virginia Euwer Wolff
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1998

"Wolff (Make Lemonade, 1993, etc.) is especially deft in creating a transforming, bittersweet post-war atmosphere and winning portraits of members of the communities who support, respect, and encourage their young girls, but come to question their own roles in the tragedy. (Fiction. 12-14)"
In Bear Creek Ridge and Barlow, two small Oregon towns, everyone is looking forward to the Bat 6 girls' softball game of 1949. Read full book review >
THE SHAKESPEARE STEALER by Gary L. Blackwood
BIOGRAPHY
Released: May 1, 1998

"Readers will find much to like in Widge, and plenty to enjoy in this gleeful romp through olde England. (Fiction. 9-12)"
This latest from Blackwood (Beyond the Door, 1991) is a delightful and heartwarming romp through Elizabethan England. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: May 1, 1998

Macdonald (First Facts About the Ancient Romans, 1997, etc.) attempts to explain past history through the experiences of children from various cultures and time periods, noting that the details of their lives did not always merit recording or preserving: "They had little money and hardly any power, so few writers or artists thought it worthwhile to record their lives." Read full book review >
THE BOXES by William Sleator
Released: May 1, 1998

"Readers will have to wait to see if there's a sequel. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Sleator (The Beasties, 1997, etc.) offers a strained mix of aliens and time travel in this tepid work of science fiction. Read full book review >
SOONER by Patricia Calvert
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 1998

"She recaps the earlier book in detail, sets the larger post—Civil War scene with a historical foreword and an afterword, and gives Tyler's change of heart believable reasons and pacing. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Having traveled all the way to Texas in a vain effort to persuade his father to come back to Missouri, Tyler, 13, discovers, resists, and ultimately embraces the inevitability of change in this strong, simple sequel to Bigger (1994). Read full book review >

MAURA'S ANGEL by Lynne Reid Banks
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1998

"Banks doesn't have all the answers, but she turns some of the questions into an enjoyable and discussion-worthy read. (Fiction. 8-12)"
In a sweet but thoughtful page-turner, Banks (Angela and Diabola, 1997, etc.) cleverly explores violence-torn modern-day Belfast through the eyes of a child, and her angel. Read full book review >
THE FALCON by Jackie French Koller
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1998

"A memorable case study in teenage guilt. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Koller follows up A Place To Call Home (1995) with this raw, funny-if-it- weren't-so-painful journal of a disabled teenager given to self-destructive behavior. Read full book review >
STRAYS LIKE US by Richard Peck
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 1998

"The novel becomes something of a treatise about a generation of children who have been cast aside by their parents; with its compelling premises and Molly's fragile but tautly convincing voice, it will be seized upon by Peck's fans, but may leave them longing for more. (Fiction. 12-14)"
With a hospitalized heroin addict for a mother and facing the prospect of another new school, Molly Moberly, 12, is a stray who delivers in an abrupt and somewhat detached narrative the details of a year in her life. Read full book review >
STAY TRUE by Marilyn Singer
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1998

"It's an unambitious, often charming sampler, sure to make readers smile, think, and dream. (Fiction. 12-15)"
Eleven well-known authors—all women—use humor, pathos, and fantasy in a skillfully wrought panoply of short stories that resound with a "you go girl" attitude toward life. Read full book review >
ALL IS WELL by Kristen Embry Litchman
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1998

An unusual story, both gentle and inspiring, of friendship in the face of serious obstacles. Read full book review >
MY LOUISIANA SKY by Kimberly Willis Holt
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 1998

"Tiger, with her warring feelings, is a believable and likable narrator, and while the offerings of big-city living are too patly rejected, a well-developed setting and fully-realized characters make this an unusually strong coming-of-age story. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In her first YA novel, Holt gives a fresh theme sensitive and deliberate treatment: The bright child of "slow" parents comes to terms with her family's place in the community. Read full book review >
SMACK by Melvin Burgess
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1998

"Based on actual people and incidents, this harrowing tale is as compellingly real as it is tragic. (glossary) (Fiction. 13-16)"
In a Carnegie Medal—winning novel (under the UK title, Junk) that cuts to the bone, Burgess puts a group of teenage runaways through four nightmarish years of heroin addiction. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >