BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Notes, bibliography, and an index are included. (Nonfiction. 10-12)"
Arthurdale, West Virginia, is the site of an important social-engineering project initiated by Eleanor Roosevelt. Read full book review >
THE TOWER AT THE END OF THE WORLD by Brad Strickland
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"For fans of Bellairs hungry for another dose of his spellbinding mystery, this will serve to deaden the thirst, but not quench it. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In comparison to the original, this addition to the series begun with John Bellairs's The House with a Clock in Its Walls (1984) falls short. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"A chronology, bibliography, index, and author's note on historical research complete the package. (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
The Annie Oakley of stage and television is a rough-and-tumble heroine who little resembles the real-life woman. Read full book review >
WITNESS by Karen Hesse
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"What Copeland created with music, and Hopper created with paint, Hesse deftly and unerringly creates with words: the iconography of Americana, carefully researched, beautifully written, and profoundly honest. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In this stunning piece of little-known American history, Hesse (Stowaway, 2000, etc.) paints small-town Vermont on the brink of self-destruction circa 1924. Read full book review >
MYSTERY
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"An extensive bibliography, photo credits, and index increase its usefulness for student reports. (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
In his usual meticulous fashion, Meltzer (Piracy and Plunder, below, etc.) explores the many facets of detective work, from the historical perspective to the contemporary sleuthing of the detective on the street and the laboratory scientist. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"For another example on this same subject, see Kate Waters's Giving Thanks (below). (foreword, bibliography, photo credits) (Nonfiction. 10-13)"
Thanksgiving, the myth, surrenders to Thanksgiving, the real story, in this collaboration of historians, scholars, and descendants of the Wampanoag people. Read full book review >
THE CALLING by Cathryn Clinton
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"For a more cohesive and well-developed exploration of faith in the South, go back to Han Nolan's Send Me Down a Miracle (1996). (Fiction. 9-12)"
A Southern tale of faith and doubt. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"But—be warned, the wordy embellishments tend to distract from these ancient stories and histories, which is really too bad in such a lush book. (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
Manushkin floridly retells ten stories about women from the Hebrew Bible, all which will be well known to those who attend religious schools where Biblical stories are told. Read full book review >
TAKEOFFS AND LANDINGS by Margaret Peterson Haddix
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Don't read this for the plot; read it for the sensitive explorations of character and emotion in a family under stress. (Fiction. 12-15)"
Pretty, popular Lori, 14, feels that just about all she has in common with her fat, slow, older brother Chuck is their mother, their father having died eight years ago. Read full book review >
CHILDREN OF THE DRAGON by Sherry Garland
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"This unusual collection of tales will work best for individual readers as they drink in the details of the stories, the background materials, and the paintings. (Folktales. 9-12)"
Six stories of varying types have been chosen by an author who is familiar with the Vietnamese people in their own country and in the US. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"It's an awe-inspiring tale, evocatively presented, and perfect for armchair travelers. (Picture book/nonfiction. 8-12)"
"Traveling—it leaves you speechless, then turns you into a storyteller." Read full book review >
GANDHI by Demi
by Demi, illustrated by Demi
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Nevertheless, a heartfelt, handsome, and uplifting treatment for those who already have prior background and interest. (Biography. 8-12)"
Demi (The Emperor's New Clothes, 2000, etc.) emphasizes the self-transforming powers that enabled Gandhi to change from frightened child to English gentleman to tongue-tied lawyer to ultimate servant of mankind with unshakable faith in the force of nonviolence and love. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >