NATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Glossary; index. (Nonfiction. 12-14)"
In the Venture series, a discussion of scientific dating, including the study of tree rings, strata, varves, carbon remains, thermoluminescence, space rocks, and radioactivity. Read full book review >
WRAPPED IN A RIDDLE by Sharon E. Heisel
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Readers will enjoy the riddles throughout; they may also find themselves suddenly interested in reading Mark Twain. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A jim-dandy of a mystery. Read full book review >

THE BIRD ATLAS by Barbara Taylor
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Index. (Nonfiction. 8- 14)"
A handsome oversize pictorial atlas that will fly off the shelf. Read full book review >
COLONIAL AMERICAN MEDICINE by Susan Neiburg Terkel
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"B&w illustrations; appendix; source notes; glossary; bibliography; index. (Nonfiction. 10-13)"
Medical practice in early America could be torture: Washington succumbed after blistering, purging, and having half his blood removed, the best care in an era ``marked by ignorant theories, ineffective treatments, a scarcity of trained physicians, poor sanitation, and frightening epidemics.'' Meanwhile, knowledge of anatomy and the causes of disease were minimal (as one doctor observed, ``it is better to let nature...take her course than to trust to the honesty and sagacity of the practitioner''). Read full book review >
THREE FACES OF VIETNAM by Richard L. Wormser
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Sparse, poorly reproduced b&w photos; bibliography; notes; index. (Nonfiction. 12-15)"
With mixed success, Wormser attempts to put a personal face on the war, supporting a general overview with frequent, short extracts from the writings of American and Vietnamese participants, here and abroad. Read full book review >

FOREST by Janet Taylor Lisle
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A deftly plotted fantasy with amusingly characterizations; a telling allegory of the roots of violence in ignorance. (Fiction. 9-13)"
From a Newbery Honor winner, the chronicle of a narrowly averted war between a society of usually peaceable squirrels and the humans who live nearby. Read full book review >
THE FLYING EMU by Sally Morgan
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Glossary. (Folklore. 5-12)"
Dedicated by the aboriginal author to ``all the naughty children in the world,'' 20 lively original stories replete with the mythic stuff of wonder tales—magic, transformation, resurrection, eating alive, disgorging, and other comically earthy workings of the digestive tract—all recounted in an engaging colloquial style. Read full book review >
AMY DUNN QUITS SCHOOL by Susan Shreve
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 9-12)"
An overscheduled sixth-grader impulsively plays hooky on Halloween and is found out when her hyperconscientious single mother unexpectedly arrives at school for the Halloween parade. Read full book review >
A WEEKEND WITH WINSLOW HOMER by Ann Keay Beneduce
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A fine introduction to an important American figure. (Biography. 8-12)"
One of the better entries in a series that approaches artists through first-person reminiscences, ostensibly addressed by the artist to a guest. Read full book review >
HERE'S TO YOU, RACHEL ROBINSON by Judy Blume
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A good, solid, working-the-family-problem story, with sure appeal for fans. (Fiction. 11-14)"
Blume returns to the trio of seventh graders introduced in Just as Long as We're Together (1987), where Stephanie's narration was colored by her parents' new separation. Read full book review >
McMUMMY by Betsy Byars
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A minor effort. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Professor Orloff has left Mozie to care for a greenhouse of experimental plants, with specific instructions for administering "Vitagrow." Read full book review >
THE BURNING BABY by John Gordon
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"For stout hearts only. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Five macabre tales of murder or suicide victims returning to exact gruesome retribution: Bernard conceals the body of the pregnant local teenager he's killed beneath a huge bonfire, only to have a ``Burning Baby'' crawl out of the fire's heart and into his lap; a corpse rises to drag its murderer ``Under the Ice'' of a frozen fen; a retired schoolteacher feeds her illegitimate granddaughter to the ``Eels'' in a canal—and the favor is returned (``When the sun came up and filled the room with warmth, Miss Jervis lay quite still. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Luis Alberto Urrea
April 21, 2015

Examining the borders between one nation and another, between one person and another, Luis Alberto Urrea’s latest story collection, The Water Museum, reveals his mastery of the short form. This collection includes the Edgar-award winning "Amapola" and his now-classic "Bid Farewell to Her Many Horses," which had the honor of being chosen for NPR's "Selected Shorts" not once but twice. Urrea has also recently published a poetry collection, Tijuana Book of the Dead, mixing lyricism and colloquial voices, mysticism and the daily grind. We talk to Urrea about both of his new books this week on Kirkus TV. View video >