LATER, GATOR by Laurence Yep
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 8, 1995

"An entertaining ending is marred by an afterword expounding the villainy of mistreating pets, but this remains an interesting slice-of-life portrait based in San Francisco's Chinatown. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Teddy's younger brother, Bobby, is kind, helpful, and loving; Teddy therefore does what he must to make Bobby's life miserable. Read full book review >
MOOSE TRACKS by Mary Casanova
ANIMALS
Released: May 8, 1995

"The attention-grabbing action and emotional struggles of the hero will hook reluctant readers, too. (Fiction. 9-12)"
A suspense tale that pits moose against men, when poachers' greed threatens wildlife in the north woods of Minnesota. Read full book review >

ORPHANS OF THE NIGHT by Josepha Sherman
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: May 8, 1995

"A winner from beginning to end. (Fiction/short stories. 11-15)"
Sherman (Windleaf, 1993, etc.) promises ``no clichÇd vampires, no trite and toothless werewolves,'' and the 14 contributors to this collection, most well known to fantasy fans, deliver on that promise. Read full book review >
STICKY BEAK by Morris Gleitzman
ADVENTURE
Released: May 1, 1995

"Whether she's making a video on pet abuse, trying to enter Darryn in a dog show, or throwing a bowl of custard into an electric fan during a party, Ro succintly makes her thoughts and feelings known. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A rare bird indeed—a sequel that is actually more enjoyable than its predecessor. Read full book review >
OUT OF THE BLUE by Sarah Ellis
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 1995

"Ellis (Pick-Up Sticks, 1992, etc.) creates well- developed characters, not only believable but wholly likable; her deft use of wit is delightful. (Fiction. 10-14)"
A warm, loving family helps Megan come to terms with major changes in her life, in a sensitive, empathetic domestic tale. Read full book review >

BLABBER MOUTH by Morris Gleitzman
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 1995

"In the first-person narration, Ro's constant complaints about her father wear thin, but she remains likable; Gleitzman (Misery Guts, 1993, etc.) writes in a direct, charming style and short (often one sentence) paragraphs that makes these easy-to-read misadventures extra appealing. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A humorous novel from Australia starring a well-meaning heroine who is tempestuous and larger-than-life—and who was born mute. Read full book review >
AN ALMOST PERFECT GAME by Stephen Manes
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 1995

"Funny incidents and one-liners sparkle throughout the seamless narrative, but Manes also inserts thoughtful dialogue about fair play and fan interference. (Fiction. 10-13)"
A valentine to a game that was, and could be again, almost perfect. Read full book review >
THE ODYSSEY by Geraldine McCaughrean
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: May 1, 1995

"A fitting companion to Rosemary Sutcliff's Black Ships Before Troy (1993). (Fiction/mythology. 11-14)"
A classic expertly retold, issued in a handsome, slightly oversize format with Ambrus's robust illustrations. Read full book review >
THE BOOK OF VIRTUES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE by William J. Bennett
NONFICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"The virtues espoused, assumed to be objective categories rooted in common sense and in universal moral imperatives, are as perennial as the grass, and even if they have become buzzwords in today's political climate, the book is not just for the ethically challenged. (Anthology. 11-13)"
A book with a mission—its purpose, in some people's minds, could not be more timely nor more necessary. Read full book review >
HIROSHIMA by Laurence Yep
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"As 1995 will mark 50 years since the bomb was dropped, new materials are needed to join Eleanor Coerr's Sadako and the Paper Cranes (1977) and Toshi Maruki's horrifying Hiroshima No Pika (1980); this offering is unlikely to lead the pack. (Fiction. 10- 13)"
Though deeply felt, a choppy, confusing account of Hiroshima's destruction that reads like a set of preliminary notes. Read full book review >
MALCOLM X by Kevin Brown
BIOGRAPHY
Released: May 1, 1995

"This isn't written with the passion of Walter Dean Myers's Malcolm X: By Any Means Necessary (1993), but it is a thoughtful, well-documented new entry in a crowded field. (notes, bibliography, index) (Biography. 11-15)"
Dramatic book design and an analytical approach mark this biography of the so-called ``angriest black man in America.'' Brown characterizes Malcolm X's life as one of repeated radical transformations—from young social work case to glib street hustler to ascetic religious convert to increasingly articulate public figure—a man whose ideas also changed, and changed again, and were still in the process of changing at his death. Read full book review >
YOU'RE DEAD, DAVID BORELLI by Susan M. Brown
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"A pat ending hardly mars this touching and enjoyable book. (Fiction. 9-13)"
His mother dead and his father on the run from the law, David finds himself swept from his comfortable but lonely life of private school and housekeeper to a new life in a foster home and public junior high school. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >