SIRENA by Donna Jo Napoli
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Fans of Greek mythology will enjoy several tales of gods, warriors, and nymphs woven throughout, but it's the timeless, entrancing love story—the heartache, the triumph, and the bittersweet ending—that grabs the heartstrings. (Fiction. 12-15)"
Sirena and her sisters are hybrids (half-human, half-fish), or mermaids, yearning for the touch and love of men, who will thereby bring them immortality. Read full book review >
THE NEW YOU by Kathleen Leverich
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"An engaging and enjoyably limned journey to self-discovery. (Fiction. 12-14)"
In this slim and breezy read, Leverich combines the universal problem of fitting in at a new school with a thought-provoking fantasy. Read full book review >

SANG SPELL by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Thoughtful readers will empathize with Josh's dilemma; while the ending is predictable, Naylor raises haunting questions. (Fiction. 11-14)"
Naylor (Achingly Alice, p. 741, etc.) explores the role synchronicity plays in life, and the mental and emotional restraints people place upon themselves. Read full book review >
THE SECRET CIRCLE by Dona Schenker
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"The adults—with the exception of Mr. Graves—are not as credible; they are either incompetent or self-involved, but don't mar this often gripping study of cliques and outsiders. (Fiction. 10-13)"
After the death of a dear neighbor, a lonely and vulnerable new girl at a private school prepares to risk everything to join the Secret Circle, a group of in-crowd girls who perform pranks as initiation. Read full book review >
THE WHITE HORSE by Cynthia D. Grant
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"She takes readers on a scary, exhausting ride, but her women are strong enough to survive, to overcome their differences, and, in the end, to try for the family they both crave. (Fiction. 12-15)"
A bitter, middle-aged teacher and a harshly used teenage mother reach out to each other in this mean-streets story from Grant (Mary Wolf, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >

A DOOR NEAR HERE by Heather Quarles
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"The characters in this novel are deeply flawed, yet readers will want to know, to the last paragraph, what happens to them. (Fiction. 11-13)"
An overstuffed page-turner, both melodramatic and absorbing, with a tried-and-true premise: a sibling's struggle to keep her family together despite overwhelming parental neglect. Read full book review >
BAD by Jean Ferris
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Ferris subtly and skillfully divines slim hope and a glimmer of choice from the necessarily weighted stories of the girls on the inside, making for a compelling read. (Fiction. 13-15)"
Ferris (Love Among the Walnuts, p. 1115, etc.) chooses an unusual locale—the Girls' Rehabilitation Center, or GRC— for this story about a teenager's attempt to bring herself into focus. Read full book review >
SWORD SONG by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"A glorious tale, full of pulse and power. (Fiction. 10-14)"
An action book if there ever was one, found in full draft among the prolific Sutcliff's papers at the time of her death in 1992, and a fine last gift. Read full book review >
BLOOMABILITY by Sharon Creech
FICTION
Released: Sept. 30, 1998

"Metaphors mixed in several languages, dream images of snow and distance, and the bittersweet terrors of adolescence will keep readers turning the pages and regretful to reach the last one. (Fiction. 9-14)"
Creech (Chasing Redbird, 1997, etc.) plies the threads of love and loss, separation and belonging, into another deeply felt novel; while it is no sin for a writer to repeatedly explore such themes, a certain sameness is descending upon her books. Read full book review >
BEAUTY QUEEN by Linda Glovach
FICTION
Released: Sept. 30, 1998

"It lacks the wild ups and downs of Go Ask Alice (1971), or the creeping horror of Melvin Burgess's more literary Smack (p. 398), but contains a heartfelt anti-drug message in the swift downward spiral of a likable main character. (Fiction. 13-15)"
By-the-numbers addiction fiction—as friend Nicole and others look on worriedly, Samantha, 19, breaks away from her alcoholic mother, simultaneously plunges into heroin abuse and earns money as a topless dancer, falls in love with a smooth- talking, thoroughly corrupt police officer, and overdoses while waiting for him to take her away from it all. Read full book review >
WHO ORDERED THE JUMBO SHRIMP? by Jon Agee
HUMOR
Released: Sept. 30, 1998

From Agee (Go Hang a Salami! Read full book review >
G IS FOR GOOGOL by David M. Schwartz
ABC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 24, 1998

"Despite a few disputes'some say it is indeed possible to create a Klein bottle—and some too-brief definitions, this overview convinces readers that math is pervasive, inescapable, huge—and never just egghead territory. (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
Readers who have so far successfully resisted the math curse will find themselves deftly ensorcelled by this alphabetic tally of mathematics concepts. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >