LORD OF THE NUTCRACKER MEN by Iain Lawrence
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

In 1914, Johnny Briggs's father marches off to WWI with the promise that he will be home by Christmas. Read full book review >
FRIENDS AND SCHOOL
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"An illuminating discussion of the Great Irish Famine and how emigrants contributed to the growth of cities around the world. (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
Using illustrations from mid-19th-century newspapers and stories of people actually involved, Bartoletti has written a fascinating account of a terrible time. Read full book review >

ANNE FRANK IN THE WORLD by Anne Frank House
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"While there are other excellent photo histories of the Holocaust, this slim volume has the attraction of Anne Frank to draw young people in. (Nonfiction. 12-14)"
The life of Anne Frank serves as the frame for this photomontage of the rise of Nazism in Germany and the Netherlands. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"An excellent look at how researchers work and a fascinating introduction to chimpanzees. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
Goodall's latest is a fascinating look at the behavior, development, and communication methods of the animals she has devoted her life to studying. Read full book review >
MANSA MUSA by Khephra Burns
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"As much about Mansa Musa's inner journey to selfhood as his outer coming of age, this is a feast for the eye and spirit both. (Illustrated fiction. 10-12)"
Illustrated by the Dillons (Two Little Trains, p. 561, etc.) at their most magisterial, this original tale of the youth of Kankan Musa, the most renowned royal descendant of the great king of Mali, Sundiata, makes a grand, compelling, sumptuously presented narrative. Read full book review >

STOLEN BY THE SEA by Anna Myers
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Sherry Garland's Silent Storm (1993) is a more compelling fictional account of the hurricane. (Fiction. 10-13)"
In this oddly distant disaster tale, two young people from opposite sides of the socioeconomic tracks are caught in the devastating Galveston Hurricane of 1900. Read full book review >
THE SEEING STONE by Kevin Crossley-Holland
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"One cannot help but compare it to T.H. White's Once and Future King, and one might be far more inclined to put that in the hands of youngsters eager for legend. (Fiction. 11-15)"
In Great Britain, this first volume in a projected Arthurian trilogy was shortlisted for the Whitbread Award, the Guardian Children's Book Prize, and won the Bronze medal, Smarties Prize. Read full book review >
LEONARDO’S HORSE by Jean Fritz
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Together, Fritz and Talbott have forged an extraordinary tribute to two dreamers 500 years apart. (Biography. 7-12)"
A veteran writer of lively biographies has turned her attention to quite an engaging story: the biography of an equine sculpture. Read full book review >
TILL TOMORROW by John Donahue
FICTION
Released: Sept. 21, 2001

"As Claude puts it, friends say a demain—until tomorrow—and that is how these boys will spend their time together. (Fiction. 8-12)"
It's the summer of 1961, and the tensions in divided Berlin are leading to fears of World War III. Read full book review >
THE REVENGE OF RANDAL REESE-RAT by Tor Seidler
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 20, 2001

"Loyally and lovably ratty. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Though a rational ratriot, Randal Reese-Rat can't help being jealous and slightly embarrassed at the way Montague Mad-Rat both saved ratkind and stole his fiancé from him in A Rat's Tale (1986). Read full book review >
PARENTS WANTED by George Harrar
NATURE
Released: Sept. 20, 2001

"A killer read. (Fiction. 10-14)"
"So you know I'm obnoxious right?" Read full book review >
TENDER by Valerie Hobbs
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 19, 2001

"A leisurely paced, somewhat gloomy story, but one that is, in the end, rewarding. (Fiction. 12-15)"
A sad, but ultimately hopeful story about missed connections and the opportunity for second chances. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >