THE WISHING BONE by Stephen Mitchell
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2003

"A handsomely packaged, nicely diverse gathering of words and art. (Poetry. 9-13)"
Plainly channeling Edward Lear and maybe Lewis Carroll too, Mitchell (Hans Christian Andersen's Nightingale, illus. by Bagram Ibatoulline, 2002, etc.) offers nine rhymed ruminations, daffy episodes, and glimpses of imaginary wildlife, all illustrated, and sometimes illuminated, by Pohrt's (The Tomb of the Boy King, 2001, etc.) small, clean-lined, delicately exact figures. Read full book review >
SHAKESPEARE BATS CLEANUP by Ron Koertge
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2003

"Kevin's mix of lame and not-so-lame poems effectively convey realistic learning and recovery curves—and may also plant the idea in receptive readers that it's okay for guys to write. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Koertge (Brimstone Journals, 2001, etc.) joins the ever-swelling ranks of writers experimenting with novels-in-verse with this journal of a teenaged jock who develops a taste for writing poetry while laid up with mono. Read full book review >

ATALANTA AND THE ARCADIAN BEAST by Jane Yolen
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"An afterword discusses which elements come from Greek literature and which the authors created for this entertaining adventure with its strong heroine. (Fiction. 9-13)"
In their third entry in the "Young Heroes" series, Yolen and Harris (Hippolyta and the Curse of the Amazons, 2002, etc.) craft another fast-paced historical novel set in ancient Greece. Read full book review >
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE’S TWELFTH NIGHT by Bruce Coville
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2003

"Prospective audiences or cast members will get a clear sense of the play's tangled plot from this, but will have to see it performed to fully appreciate its sheer hilarity and joyful climax. (Picture book. 9-12)"
Coville, who's done so well with these in the past (Romeo and Juliet, 1999, etc), prefaces his latest Shakespearean retelling with the claim that its themes of trying on a new identity and having to yearn in silence for another will carry particular resonance for young readers as "the struggle of adolescence in microcosm!" Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2003

"Fascinating. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
The familiar starling, gypsy moth, and kudzu vine are all alien to North America, wreaking havoc on established plant and animal ecosystems and threatening biodiversity. Read full book review >

MILLIONS TO MEASURE by David M. Schwartz
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2003

"The Schwartz-Kellogg team has got it right again: this should be part of every professional's collection. (Picture book. 5-12)"
Marvelosissimo the Mathematical Magician returns, this time tackling measurement, in this latest installment of the winning "millions" series (If You Made a Million, 1989, etc.). Read full book review >
TORNADO! by Cynthia Pratt Nicolson
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2003

From the ominous black funnel cloud on the cover, to the harrowing eyewitness accounts and the many slam-bang color photographs of the damage caused by tornadoes, this title grabs the attention of readers fascinated by natural disasters. Read full book review >
HANA’S SUITCASE by Karen Levine
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2003

In 1998, the director of the newly endowed Tokyo Holocaust Education Resource Center's museum, whose mission is to educate Japanese students about the horrors of the Holocaust, set out to obtain artifacts for display. Read full book review >
PAUL REVERE’S RIDE by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2003

"A fine version, although it is not so powerful or engaging as Charles Santore's (below) or the Caldecott Honor-winning marvel by Christopher Bing (2001). (historical note) (Picture book/poetry. 7-12)"
They don't write ‘em like this any more, which is too bad, as Longfellow gave stirring life to a small part of the Revolutionary War and made a silversmith a legend in a poem that has proven extremely popular to illustrators. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2003

"In all, a very different experience from the quieter drama of Monica Vachula's Ride (above). (artist's note) (Picture book/poetry. 7-12)"
Longfellow's familiar verse comes to splendid life in dynamic paintings. Read full book review >
ANIMAL SENSE by Diane Ackerman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 11, 2003

"Good poetry, fine illustration, a bit of natural history gently rendered and more than occasionally funny—what child could ask for anything more than this exquisite little gem? (Poetry. 7-12)"
Poet and naturalist Ackerman (The Night Crossing, 1994, etc.) examines the five senses by way of the animal kingdom. Read full book review >
THE DARK HORSE by Marcus Sedgwick
ADVENTURE
Released: Feb. 11, 2003

"Using short, strong words appropriate to the Nordic setting, Sedgwick (Witch Hill, not reviewed, etc.) crafts an effective tale that, despite the unconvincing transformation of Mouse, will draw readers in and keep them entranced. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In spare, powerful prose, set in northern Atlantic lands, Sedgwick tells a coming-of-age story steeped in mystery and danger. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >