DOGS DON'T EAT JAM AND OTHER THINGS BIG KIDS KNOW by Sarah Tsiang
CLASSICS
Released: Nov. 1, 2011

"It is all just too jumbled to succeed as a charming older-sibling book. (Picture book. 3-6)"
An older sister prattles on to her newborn sibling about all the things to learn in the world. Read full book review >
THE HANGMAN IN THE MIRROR by Kate Cayley
CLASSICS
Released: Nov. 1, 2011

"A slow paced and ultimately depressing tale of a not-often-depicted place and time that will, though somewhat flawed, satisfy dedicated historical-fiction fans. (Historical fiction. 11 & up)"
It is 18th-century Montreal, and 15-year-old Françoise Laurent has been sentenced to be hanged. How she came to that position is only gradually uncovered. Read full book review >

HELD by Edeet Ravel
CLASSICS
Released: Nov. 1, 2011

"Less thriller than psychological puzzler, this novel effectively keep readers guessing. (Suspense. 12 & up)"
Held hostage by a terrorist group somewhere in Europe, Chloe finds herself increasingly attracted to her captor as her mother and friends back home do everything they can to free her. Read full book review >
ALWAYS NEVERLAND by Zoe Barton
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 11, 2011

"There are many good stories still to tell about the Boy Who Never Grew Up, but this isn't one of them. (Fantasy. 9-12)"
A petulant brat brings Girl Power to a Neverland devoid of whimsy and charm in this unnecessary sequel to Peter Pan. Read full book review >
SIR SETH THISTLETHWAITE AND THE KINGDOM OF THE CAVES by Richard Thake
CLASSICS
Released: Sept. 15, 2011

"The potential strength of this presentation would be as a read-aloud to grade-schoolers, who would, no doubt, enjoy the difficulties the adult reader would encounter, wading through all the wacky words. (Fantasy. 8-11)"
Two imaginative 10-year-old boys embark on a disbelief-suspending adventure in this second of a series. Read full book review >

CLASSICS
Released: Sept. 15, 2011

"Overall, the stories are engaging and inspiring, from the tribulations that came upon Emancipation to the strange new world opened to Chinese workers recruited for the Transcontinental Railroad to the pure brilliance of a school for the blind. (Historical fiction. 9-13)"
Brief fictional sketches walk readers through 150 years of American history. Read full book review >
BORN UGLY by Beth Goobie
CLASSICS
Released: Sept. 15, 2011

"Working-class, alcoholic Shir is no swan in ugly-duckling disguise, but despite the rotten hand life's dealt her, she's got heart and courage and a stubborn refusal to give up that will keep readers rooting for her. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
This taut thriller showcases the award-winning Canadian author's gift for creating memorable teen characters who confront tough issues alone—in this case, teen bullying, portrayed in gritty, claustrophobic detail by its victim. Read full book review >
MONEY BOY by Paul Yee
CLASSICS
Released: Sept. 13, 2011

"Overall, this insightful and deeply felt novel makes a valuable contribution to an underexplored topic and is highly recommended. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
After four years in Canada, Ray Liu is stressed out. On top of his parents' divorce in China, his father's remarriage, learning English and struggling in high school, Ray faces another challenge: he's gay. Read full book review >
NO ORDINARY DAY by Deborah Ellis
CLASSICS
Released: Sept. 13, 2011

"A true-to-life portrait of a young girl's cheerful selfishness in this surprisingly optimistic novel of unrelenting poverty. (Fiction. 9-11)"
Homeless orphan Valli is always friendly, if amoral. Read full book review >
STEPLINGS by C.W. Smith
CLASSICS
Released: Sept. 2, 2011

"Slow, a little weak in the plot department, but rich in psychological insight and lit by occasional flashes of humor. (Fiction. 15-19, adult)"
A shared road trip creates a bond between two step-siblings, but this inward-looking character study focuses at least as much on their parents. Read full book review >
NINJA COWBOY BEAR PRESENTS THE CALL OF THE COWBOY by David Bruins
CLASSICS
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"So far, the ninja and the cowboy have received time in the spotlight; fans will be anticipating the bear's entry, which is sure to follow. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Three good friends (who have been optioned for an animated series) experience friction but work it all out. Read full book review >
SKANK by Teresa McWhirter
CLASSICS
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

This stark, convincing portrait of a girl struggling to live in a tough neighborhood should appeal to teens looking for realism. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >