Children's Book Reviews (page 3204)

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Photos and historical reproductions; bibliography; index. (Biography. 9-12)"
Presenting the dramatic life of one of slavery's staunchest opponents, the McKissacks illuminate the most important issues of 19th-century American politics. Read full book review >
HUMMINGBIRDS by Esther Quesada Tyrrell
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Index. (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
Breathtaking color photos of these ``flying jewels''—perched on a penny, sipping nectar on the wing, performing a courtship dance, feeding their young. Read full book review >

BECOME A BIRD AND FLY! by Michael Elsohn Ross
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Not essential but attractive, and a valid supplementary approach to the subject. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Nicky likes to imagine flying like a bird; one day, his neighbor Avis tells him exactly how to become one: ``Close your eyes...let your thoughts take wing,'' and imagine growing lighter, more streamlined. ``Your heavy teeth fall out. Read full book review >
THE HOPSCOTCH TREE by Leda Siskind
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Uh-Oh was so heavy I was going to get trapped and crushed by it''—a cutesy shorthand that seems gratingly out of character for the otherwise articulate Edith. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Fifth-grader Edith Gold finds that the hardest part of adjusting to her new school is withstanding the torments of anti-Semitic Zandra Kott and her gang; but Edith finds solace in whispering her troubles to the immense ``Hopscotch Tree'' on the playground. Read full book review >
FIESTA! by Elizabeth Silverthorne
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Glossary; calendar of fiestas; further reading; index. (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
Subtitled Mexico's Great Celebrations, a basic discussion— in pleasant if somewhat dry prose—of the three cultures that have influenced Mexican life and art and the many colorful holidays and feasts that have resulted from this unique mix. Read full book review >

EYE OF THE BEHOLDER by Daniel Hayes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"A funny book with real insights, but much in need of pruning. (Fiction. 11-15)"
The eighth-graders who appeared in The Trouble with Lemons (1991) are back in a stronger second novel, less freighted with the life conflicts of its adult characters. Read full book review >
THE GREAT CHANGE by White Deer of Autumn
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"The author has taught in American Indian Movement schools; both he and the illustrator are Native Americans. (Fiction/Young reader. 6-10)"
Mourning the death of her grandfather, Wanba and her Grandma catch fish, returning what they don't need to the sea; pause on their return home to fertilize their corn with fish heads; and converse gently about the ``Circle of Life.'' Illustrated in lovely impressionistic watercolors rendered in soft colors in a spare yet evocative style, the narrative is not so much a story as a fictional setting for the Native American philosophy of care for the natural world and the continuity of life, symbolized here by several of the creatures the two characters observe (a fishing pelican; a caterpillar) as well as by Grandma passing on her own knowledge to Wanba. Read full book review >
THROUGH OUR EYES by Lee Bennett Hopkins
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"An attractive, up-to-the- minute setting for some proven favorites. (Poetry/Picture book. 4-8)"
What distinguishes this particular volume (subtitled Poems and Pictures About Growing Up), by a skilled and prolific poet- anthologist, is the crisply reproduced color photos linking the 16 poems—most of them from contemporary authors and already familiar—to the world that today's kids know: urban, multicultural, and not always privileged. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"The story also makes a good vehicle for viewing love and loss, simply but thoughtfully—a good choice for children who have recently grappled with a first family death. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Cousins Emily and Tory, 11, are fast friends, unlike in temperament but similar in their yearning for romance. Read full book review >
DEAR MOM, GET ME OUT OF HERE! by Ellen Conford
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Send Conford fans who enjoy this on to Gordon Korman's books. (Fiction. 11-13)"
A lightweight farce with a daffy but resourceful cast and a surprise climax. Read full book review >
THE LEMONADE BABYSITTER by Karen Waggoner
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Insightful and entertaining. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The author of Dad Gummit and Ma Foot (1990) makes a stronger second showing with a story about a classic situation: getting used to a new sitter. Read full book review >
WONDERFUL WORMS by Linda Glaser
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"A welcome contribution to ecology for the very young. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 3-7)"
A celebration and natural history of the helpful ``underground gardeners.'' In warm brown, pale greens, and bright touches of pink and orange, Krupinski uses double-spread cross sections to depict both the soil surface with its plants, animals, and people and the busy earthworms below, effectively focusing attention with her sparse detail, flat shapes, and eye-on-the-ground perspectives. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >