Children's Book Reviews (page 3212)

SIR WHONG AND THE GOLDEN PIG by Oki S. Han
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1993

"A mixed effort, but the story itself, with its trickster appropriately tricked himself, is appealing. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
Known for his wisdom as well as his wealth and generosity, Sir Whong would not normally loan such a large sum as 1,000 nyung to a stranger, but ``Mr. Oh'' cons him with a sad story and what looks like good security: a golden ``family treasure.'' Months later, when Whong notices that his ``gold'' pig is beginning to tarnish, he raises a hullabaloo: the precious pig is missing, he cries, and when Mr. Oh arrives, hoping to extract still more money in recompense, Whong gives him the pig in return for the original sum. Read full book review >
THE FIREBIRD by Selina Hastings
adapted by Selina Hastings, illustrated by Reg Cartwright
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1993

"A lively addition to folklore collections. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-10)"
This is not the story made familiar by the ballet, but a related tale in which the firebird figures mostly at the outset, when one of its feathers is found by a huntsman who presents it to his king—a tyrant whose response is to send the poor fellow off to fetch the bird, which he is able to do with the advice of his admirable talking horse. Read full book review >

TORTOISE SOLVES A PROBLEM by Avner Katz
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 28, 1993

"The author's cartoon-style illustrations are unassuming, but appropriately satirical and expressive. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In a whimsical ``why'' story by an Israeli author, published in Hebrew in 1979, early tortoises (not yet equipped with shells) come up with a unique solution to their homelessness. Read full book review >
GRANDMA by Alison Dexter
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 28, 1993

"A fresh look at a perennial theme. (Picture book. 3-7)"
From a new British illustrator, a cheery intergenerational good time. Read full book review >
SERIOUS SCIENCE by Janice Lee Smith
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 28, 1993

"With consistently perky dialogue, dozens of brief, funny incidents, and Gackenbach's appealing primary- graders sprinkled liberally throughout (plus the skeleton Mr. D. contributes adorning the jacket): an inviting entry in a popular series. (Fiction. 7-9)"
After Ms. D.'s class gets to participate in the big kids' science fair, the children develop just the exhibits that those familiar with the six earlier ``Adam Joshua'' books would expect- -Nelson hopes to prove that his fish has ESP; Sidney is growing cultures in his big brother's socks; and so on. Read full book review >

A STRANGER HERE by Thelma Hatch Wyss
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 28, 1993

A frothy but refreshingly unportentous tale about an Idaho girl who forms a romantic attachment to the ghost of her cousin Roseanne's fiancÇ, shot down over the Pacific on the day Jada was born 16 years ago. Read full book review >
OVER BACK by Beverly Major
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 28, 1993

"A nourishing picture of one child's pleasure in the natural world. (Picture book. 5-10)"
A young African-American shares her joy in the world out beyond her family's barn, where there are blueberries to eat, walls to climb, and sweet-smelling arbutus so fragrant that ``You have to smell the flowers and smell them again, the way you have to keep looking at a rainbow until it's gone.'' A creek for wading, frogs' eggs, and a ``slow and lumpy, bumpy'' cow to ride home all add up to a lyrical idyll of country life. Read full book review >
MARUSHKA'S EGG by Elsa Okon Rael
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 26, 1993

"Entertaining and attractive. (Young reader/Picture book. 5-9)"
Sent to buy an egg for her mother's Easter bread, Marushka is entranced by the beautifully decorated one displayed by a woman in the market. Read full book review >
TODAY IS MONDAY by Eric Carle
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 24, 1993

"Music included, but the song isn't sourced. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Carle's illustrations for this catchy, lighthearted cumulative song ("...today is Tuesday, Tuesday spaghetti, Monday string beans, All you hungry children Come and eat it up") originally appeared in 1977 as a frieze; they are even more welcome in this attractive book showing a porcupine eating the beans, an elephant slopping up Wednesday's "ZOOOOP," a cat snitching Thursday's roast beef, and so on. Read full book review >
TOM by Tomie dePaola
by Tomie dePaola, illustrated by Tomie dePaola
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 24, 1993

"A delightfully offbeat vignette of boyish mischief reinforcing the bond between generations; dePaola's handsomely designed illustrations have unusual warmth here, subtly expressing the characters' affection. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Another autobiographical story from dePaola, this time about his grandfather, who ingenuously explains that "We're named after each other, Tommy. Read full book review >
LILI AT BALLET by Rachel Isadora
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 23, 1993

"There's little mention here of discipline or hard work; still, an attractive and informative first look. (Picture book. 4-9)"
With a minimal explanatory text, a realistic depiction of a serious young ballet student and her class. Read full book review >
ZEBRA'S HICCUPS by David McKee
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 23, 1993

"Try this when someone really does have the hiccups. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Dapper zebra is far too dignified to follow his friends' advice for getting rid of his hiccups—drinking water upside down simply isn't his style. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >