Children's Book Reviews (page 3212)

I LOVE MY BUZZARD by Tres Seymour
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1994

"Pure fun. (Picture book. 4-9)"
An effervescent, kid-appealing parody of a popular folk song (``Yonder Tree''): An impish-looking boy details the delights of his bizarre pets (``I love my warthog and my warthog loves me./He blows his round nose on my sleeve./He borrows my toothpaste, my brush, and my floss./My mom has asked him to leave.'') Read full book review >
ONE SMALL SQUARE: CAVE by Donald M. Silver
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"Addresses to write to for more information; further reading; index. (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
Moving from the ferns, owls, bats, wood rats, and crayfish found in the half light near a cave's entrance to the fungi, blind salamanders, colorless isopods, and sightless fish deep within, Silver presents a typical cave's geological formations, plants, and animals and goes on to tell how cave residents find food and to introduce other kinds of caves. Read full book review >

MRS. PEACHTREE AND THE EIGHTH AVENUE CAT by Erica Silverman
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1994

"Zelinsky's The Story of Mrs. Lovewright and Purrless Her Cat (1985) would make a pungent contrast. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Even Mrs. Peachtree's name belies her gruff exterior, so it's no surprise when she and a persistent stray cat reach affectionate accommodation; but it is satisfying. Read full book review >
AROUND TOWN by Chris K. Soentpiet
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"A fine debut; an illustrator to watch. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Not every library will need this pictorial survey of New York City's simpler outdoor delights—an open hydrant on a summer day, street performers and vendors, chess in the park, feeding the pigeons—but it's worth noting that this new Korean-born illustrator is a promising student of mentor Ted Lewin's style (he thanks both Ted and Betsy Lewin for their guidance). Read full book review >
THE GENTLEMAN AND THE KITCHEN MAID by Diane Stanley
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"Share this pre-museum treat with the art teacher. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Scene: an elegant museum exhibit where a dapper gentleman (by Frans Hals or Rembrandt?) has long gazed affectionately from his frame at a wholesome lass with a basket of apples (typical Vermeer). Read full book review >

LILY by Abigail Thomas
by Abigail Thomas, illustrated by William Low
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1994

"Beautifully reflecting the simple story's mood, Low's art is rendered in richly shadowed pastels brightened by occasional patches of sun; he's especially creative in using points of view to emphasize Lily's uncertainty and sense of loss. (Picture book. 3-8)"
The trauma of moving as experienced by an appealing little black dog—an inspired take on this frequent topic, since it's truly impossible to tell Lily what's going on or to reassure her with explanations. Read full book review >
BENEATH THE STONE by Bernard Wolf
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"Map; pronunciation guide; note about the Zapotecs. (Nonfiction. 5-9)"
In appealing, handsomely composed color photos and a brief but informatative text, a portrait of Leodegario Vicente Golan Ruiz (``Leo'') and his large family, whose tapetes (rugs or hangings) are ``famous throughout Mexico.'' At six, Leo is already a weaver of ``small tapetes in simple patterns.'' Wolf details his typical day (including school), tells how his family celebrates ``The Days of the Dead'' and other holidays, and depicts visits to the ancient capital of the Zapotecs (their ``impressive culture'' was one of several that were flourishing when the Spaniards arrived in A.D. 1519) and to a market (Leo's work sells quickly, but the low price two of his mother's tapetes bring is matter of concern to these hardworking people). Read full book review >
ANIMAL FARE by Jane Yolen
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"As she did for Yolen's Raining Cats and Dogs (1993), Street provides pen-and-watercolor spreads in bright, airy colors; her raffish visualizations of such useful concoctions as the 'Giraft' ('periscope necks fore and aft') and the 'Hippopotanoose' are a hoot. (Poetry/Picture book. 4-8)"
In the tradition of Lear, Carroll, and Seuss, pure nonsense: 16 deftly fashioned rhymes about newly imagined animals. Read full book review >
THREE TWO ONE DAY by Debbie Driscoll
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"An engaging way to rehearse the days of the week. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A moppet, blond like her mom, is busy with different activities on each day of the week, all succinctly described in verse whose play with sound and sense tickles the ear: ``Bike on Tuesday,/win or lose day./Crash and bruise day,/black-and-blue day./Hike on Tuesday,/muddy shoes day./Squishy ooze day,/explore on Tuesday.'' Days of chores at home with Mom or Dad (``Paint on Saturday,/climb the ladder day...''), attending a playschool (multicultural), and visiting friends (``Hide on Sunday,/three two one day./Ice-cream sundae, week is done day'') round out a happy, energetic seven days, all amusingly depicted in Cravath's cheerful pen-and-watercolor illustrations. Read full book review >
ALICE IN-BETWEEN by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"Still, a casual but unexpectedly warm kiss from old friend Patrick at book's end suggests that the new teenager — as thoughtful and lively as ever — will soon be on to the next stage. (Fiction. 10-14)"
The fifth book about Alice slips comfortably into formula, but fans of the motherless preteen(now completing seventh grade) won't object. Read full book review >
FRANK FISTER'S HIDDEN TALENT by Paul Brett Johnson
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

A disappointing clinker from the author of The Cow Who Wouldn't Come Down (1993). Read full book review >
REBEL by Allan Baillie
by Allan Baillie, illustrated by Di Wu
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"A valuable offering, suggesting a variety of creative uses. (Picture book. 5-10)"
With ``long columns of crunching, hard-faced soldiers,'' the General and his artillery march over Burma's dusty plains to order a playground destroyed while children watch. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >