Children's Book Reviews (page 3213)

CHILDREN'S BIBLE STORIES by Miriam Chaikin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"The appealing jacket features the Peaceable Kingdom with a child astride a flower-bedecked lion; a portion of the proceeds will be donated to Save the Children. (Nonfiction. 6-10)"
Twenty-six of the best known Old Testament stories—Adam and Eve, Noah, Samson and Delilah, David and Goliath, Jonah, Daniel in the lion's den, etc.—skillfully condensed and paraphrased, yet retaining their inherent drama: an impressive example of high- quality bookmaking that is far less wordy and more beautiful than most Bible story collections. Read full book review >
SNOWY by Berlie Doherty
by Berlie Doherty, illustrated by Keith Bowen
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

A two-time Carnegie winner, acclaimed for her poetic, richly perceptive novels (Granny Was a Buffer Girl, 1988), gives a uniquely British flavor to a familiar scenario: Miss Smith asks her students to bring their pets to school; when Rachel can't produce the one she glowingly describes (``He's as big as a mountain...And he's got bells and ribbons and a swingletree. Read full book review >

COTTON MILL TOWN by Kathleen Hershey
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Still, memory is selective, and the nostalgia's warm glow is genuine. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Speaking in the voice of the child she was when ice-cream cones were a nickel, the author reminisces about visiting her grandmama in North Carolina. Read full book review >
THE SHUTEYES by Mary James
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Contrived and pointless; concluding with Shakespeare's lovely words on dreams (from The Tempest) seems startlingly irrelevant. (Fiction. 9-12)"
The pseudonymous M. E. Kerr appears once again under her second nom de plume, adopted for Shoebag (1990), a delightfully comical reversal of Kafka's Metamorphosis (to his horror, a cockroach becomes a boy). Read full book review >
GIRL WONDER AND THE TERRIFIC TWINS by Malorie Blackman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"B&w pencil drawings of all the mishaps. (Fiction. 6-8.)"
Maxine and her younger twin brothers imagine themselves to be superheroes as they confront everyday problems—like how to retrieve their soccer ball from a grouchy neighbor's flowerbed, rescue a cat from a tree, or persuade their mother to let them have a pet. Read full book review >

BACKYARD BEAR by Jim Murphy
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Brief but interesting bibliography, including books from several state agencies. (Picture book. 4-9)"
Told mostly from a bear's point of view, a thoughtful, nonjudgmental, and scrupulously realistic depiction of people in uneasy confrontation with the wild. Read full book review >
JUNIE B. JONES AND A LITTLE MONKEY BUSINESS by Barbara Park
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 6-8)"
The fractious kindergartener of Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus (p. 993) has a new baby brother her grandma calls ``the cutest little monkey!'' Junie hasn't seen him yet, but she has told the kids in her class that he's ``A REAL, ALIVE, BABY MONKEY,'' and she's taking bids from her ``bestest'' friends for the first look. Read full book review >
TOYING WITH DANGER by Drew Stevenson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Fiction. (9-11)"
Clark returns—with Sarah and his best friend Frog—for another ``Sarah Capshaw Mystery.'' When the three come across a Frankenstein robot in a barn, the discovery that it belongs to a toy inventor initially squashes Sarah's hopes for a monstrously good mystery. Read full book review >
HANK'S WORK by Joshua Schreier
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"The bold, stylized forms and bright colors will be fine for groups; also, a good choice to share with the art teacher. (Picture book. 4-7)"
The author of Luigi's All-Night Parking Lot (1990) enriches a story about a boy—a boy whose dad is too busy to recognize the importance of his son's activities—with a fantasy element dramatizing the intensity of a child's imagination. Read full book review >
THE TETON SIOUX by Evelyn Wolfson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"List of important dates; glossary; excellent bibliography and index. (Nonfiction. 10-12)"
A brisk but thorough and informative history of the Lakota (Teton Sioux), with a glance at the present: How they got to the Great Plains, life before and after the advent of horses, and various ceremonies (though the deep religious motivation characteristic of these people is not conveyed). Read full book review >
THE BEAR NOBODY WANTED by Allan Ahlberg
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Perfect for sharing aloud. (Fiction. 7-12)"
Made on an assembly line, the bear fails inspection and lands in the reject bin—a calamity that, ironically, is more difficult for him to endure since it's a result of his supercilious expression: a mouth stitch gone awry and a misplaced eye affect his character as much as they do his visage. Read full book review >
WHO SAYS A DOG GOES BOW-WOW? by Hank De Zutter
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"There's some disparity between format and subject appeal here; still, creative adults are sure to find uses for this attractive, multicultural look at a classic topic. (Picture book. 4-10)"
Only in English does the dog say ``Bow-wow''; Finns, Turks, Russians, and Poles agree it's ``How-how,'' while a dozen other languages come up with even more transliterations, as different as ``Ar-ar'' and ``Mong-mong.'' Varying his introductory question only slightly (``What does a lamb say?'' ``How does a cat sound?''), De Zutter lists sounds attributed to 16 animals, in several tongues for each. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >