Children's Book Reviews (page 3214)

THE WOMAN WHO RIDES LIKE A MAN by Tamora Pierce
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1986

"This fantasy provides food for introspection as well as flights of imagination into a magical kingdom. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Courage, skill, and magic are qualities that characterize 18-year-old Alanna in this third volume of the Song of the Lioness series. Read full book review >
VOLCANOES by Franklyn M. Branley
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 10, 1985

"Simont's varied illustrations—be they maps, diagrams, turbulent scenes, or pictures of people—are as vigorous and telling as the text."
This trim overview gives young readers an excellent grounding on volcanoes in an efficient few words. Read full book review >

BOY by Roald Dahl
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 1984

Throughout my young days at school and just afterwards a number of things happened to me that I have never forgotten. . . . Read full book review >
THE PAIN AND THE GREAT ONE by Judy Blume
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1984

"And if anyone can remove the picture-book onus, it's Blume—so this back-to-back confrontation, illustrated in the same waggish spirit, should garner appreciative recognition."
How two jealous siblings feel about one another—starting with a third-grader's gripes about her first-grade brother, the Pain. Read full book review >
WAR HORSE by Michael Morpurgo
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 22, 1983

"Despite relentless English and German anti-war rumination, and Joey's own supra-equine understandings: some distinct glimpses of how it was to be a war-horse—in addition to that thundering melodrama. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
In effect, a horse's eye view of the First World War—heart-rending in Black Beauty tradition, anti-war like All Quiet..., certainly unusual and dramatic. Read full book review >

SKINNYBONES by Barbara Park
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1982

"It's a neat enough outcome for this sort of easy walk."
This opens with sixth-grader Alex sending off a smart-alec entry to a Kitty Fritters commercial contest, but it soon settles into his problem as the smallest, poorest, most humiliated player in the local Little League—as he puts it, referring to his repeated winning of the "most improved player" award, "the only one to go from stinko to smelly six years in a row." Read full book review >
THE PHILHARMONIC GETS DRESSED by Karla Kuskin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1982

"Great fun, then, that's also an inspired approach to concert-going."
Well may you blink—but this is gloriously for real: on the cover is a woman struggling into a long black dress with an instrument case propped alongside. Read full book review >
THE DAY JIMMY'S BOA ATE THE WASH by Trinka Hakes Noble
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 28, 1981

"Those who respond to this sort of whipped-up frenzy can trust Kellogg's clever twists to keep the action from flagging."
A chaotic class trip to the farm is pictured with Kellogg's usual delight in disorder and related backwards, as it were, by a child whose report to her mother gets wilder and wilder as it unwinds: " 'Why were [the pigs] eating your lunches?' 'Because we threw their corn at each other, and they didn't have anything else to eat.'...'What was Jimmy's pet boa constrictor doing on the farm?' 'Oh, he brought it to meet all the farm animals, but the chickens didn't like it.'..." Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 8, 1981

"It's a question of sensibility."
Unquestionably a labor of love, this is set in an inn presided over by William Blake. Read full book review >
WHO STOLE THE WIZARD OF OZ? by Avi
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1981

Who stole The Wizard of Oz? Read full book review >
ENCOUNTER AT EASTON by Avi
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1980

Robert Linnly and Elizabeth Mawes, the boy and girl runaways aided by orphan Peter York in Night Journeys (1979), continue their flight in this crisp chronicle, which is presented as testimony by a number of those involved in the story. Read full book review >
HICKORY by Palmer Brown
by Palmer Brown, illustrated by Palmer Brown
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 6, 1978

"The wistfulness that's Palmer Brown's—with a twist, here, of E. B. White—and some characteristically winsome details (like the pickle jar that serves as Hickory's sun parlor) give this a quiet appeal however less than memorable it may be. (Fantasy. 6-9)"
Palmer Brown's first book in 20 years looks and sounds—and sometimes resounds—like Cheerful (1957), though the situation and its development are less inspired (remember churchmouse Cheerful singing "Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John") and the illustrations accompany rather than balance the text—which in any case has less intriguing pictorial possibilities. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >