Children's Book Reviews (page 3214)

SKYLARK by Patricia MacLachlan
ADVENTURE
Released: March 30, 1994

"Not outstanding, but amiable; fans will rejoice, and there'll be no trouble selling the first printing of 50,000. (Fiction. 8-12)"
The eagerly awaited sequel to Sarah, Plain and Tall, which has already appeared on TV with a script by MacLachlan. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 23, 1994

"A handsome edition, with especially felicitous typography and design. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-10)"
A scrupulous note explains that, with ``minimal'' editing, this is the great Russian collector Afanasev's version, ``crafted by Petr Nikolaevich Polevoi (1839-1902), a well-known historian, archaeologist, and Shakespearean scholar.'' In outline, it differs little from Arthur Ransome's text as used in Uri Shulevitz's Caldecott winner (1968); but where Ransome is more literary and humorous, the more straightforward text here is propelled by its energetic cadence. Read full book review >

ADVENTURE
Released: March 23, 1994

"Venti's soft-pencil illustrations pick up amusingly on Fritz's humor (though not on the wry indignation that frequently propels it), while his frequent maps help to clarify the journeys. (Nonfiction. 7-11)"
Deftly navigating the politically correct waters of revisionist history, Fritz surveys the brief period, beginning early in the 15th century (when the world known to Europeans consisted mostly of Europe, the Middle East, and parts of Asia), during which most of the globe's coastlines were first mapped. Read full book review >
NOAH by Patricia Lee Gauch
adapted by Patricia Lee Gauch, illustrated by Jonathan Green
ANIMALS
Released: March 23, 1994

"He depicts most of the humans as black (though one son's wife has blue eyes), and makes creative use of the text's reiterated ``two by two'' in his handsome compositions. Proof positive that, when it comes to books about Noah, there is always ``room for one more.'' (Picture book. 3-8)"
In a simple, invitingly cadenced retelling beginning, ``Here is Noah with grace in his eyes,/Here are his sons/right by his side,'' Gauch adheres closely to the events described in the Bible, from God's command to Noah to build an ark to his family's planting a garden after the animals have finally left them ``happily alone.'' Green, whose debut in Lauture's Father and Son (1992) was widely praised, draws again on his Gullah heritage for paintings in lustrous saturated colors. Read full book review >
SUNSHINE HOME by Eve Bunting
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 21, 1994

"A poignant slice of life in the 90's; Timmie's successful intervention sends the message that even a child can offer real consolation. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Timmie and his parents make their first visit to Gram at a nursing home; she's had to move there since "the doctors said she needed full-time nursing care." Read full book review >

TANO AND BINTI by Linda DaVolls
ANIMALS
Released: March 21, 1994

A somewhat fictionalized but essentially realistic narrative describing how, in 1975, two chimpanzees born at the London Zoo were returned to Africa and adapted to life in the wild. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 21, 1994

"An interesting idea, but less than successful in execution. (Nonfiction. 10-12)"
A single California redwood spans 2500 years, from 325 B.C. until it's felled by lightning in 1869. Read full book review >
WHAT I'LL REMEMBER WHEN I AM A GROWNUP by Gina Willner-Pardo
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 21, 1994

"It's a best-case situation, and Daniel, like his parents, is a bit too wise to be true, but the feelings, details, and Daniel's boyish narrative voice are all likably authentic. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Worrying about what Dad and his new wife Marilyn are waiting to tell him during his upcoming visit (``nobody ever wants to tell you anything good in person''), Daniel ruminates over what previous events in his life—significant or seemingly insignificant—have turned out to be particularly memorable. Read full book review >
CITY DOG by Karla Kuskin
ANIMALS
Released: March 21, 1994

"Any child who's been blessed with a similar release- -whether from school, city, or something less concrete—will relate to the dog's euphoria. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Repeating this gentle, lyrical poem—about a city dog's response to being at large in the country—on a single page at the end is a nice touch; seeing the lines reassembled, readers can better appreciate the play of sound and sense. Read full book review >
STOLEN THUNDER by Shirley Climo
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 21, 1994

"An entertaining story, much enhanced by the art accompanying it. (Folklore/Picture book. 6- 11)"
From the adapter of, among others, The Egyptian Cinderella (1989), another straightforward retelling. Read full book review >
TAP-TAP by Karen Lynn Williams
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 21, 1994

"There's lots of regional flavor in the lively, well- researched watercolors, too, and in occasional French words thrown into the dialogue. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Add this simple story about Haiti to the growing list of high- quality picture books set in the Caribbean (see also Tukama Tootles the Flute by Phillis Gershator, p. 142). Read full book review >
TIME FOR ANDREW by Mary Downing Hahn
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 21, 1994

"Another solid and enjoyable performance from this popular, award-winning author. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Staying with Great-Aunt Blythe in the ancestral home while his parents are on a dig, "Drew" — so called because his great-grandfather Edward abhors his full name — is immediately aware of a presence in the attic. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >