Children's Book Reviews (page 3216)

REBEL by Allan Baillie
by Allan Baillie, illustrated by Di Wu
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"A valuable offering, suggesting a variety of creative uses. (Picture book. 5-10)"
With ``long columns of crunching, hard-faced soldiers,'' the General and his artillery march over Burma's dusty plains to order a playground destroyed while children watch. Read full book review >
AFTER THE FLOOD by Arthur  Geisert
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1994

Touching his elegantly delineated etchings with watercolor, in the manner of hand-colored 19th-century illustrations, an artist best known for the antics of his pigs (Pigs from A to Z, 1986) adds a sequel to his version of The Ark (1988). Read full book review >

THE BOY ON A BLACK HORSE by Nancy Springer
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1994

"Everything a young, horse-crazy romantic could wish: a book 12- and 13-year-olds will pass around until it's in tatters. (Fiction. 10-14)"
A mysterious Gypsy boy, Chav, who rides a black horse and exudes angst is befriended by Gray, who's still wracked by the loss of her entire family. Read full book review >
MAKE A WISH, MOLLY by Barbara Cohen
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"Altogether, a worthy continuation of a justly celebrated story. (Picture book. 6-9)"
In a companion to Molly's Pilgrim (1983), Molly Hyman—still in third grade and still struggling to adjust to American customs- -attends her first birthday party, only to be hideously embarrassed: since it's Passover, she can't eat any of the elegant cake and is thus exposed to the scorn and prejudice of her nemesis, Elizabeth. Read full book review >
THE IROKO-MAN by Phillis Gershator
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

So hideous and powerful is the man-spirit dwelling in the iroko tree that anyone who looks at his face goes mad and dies. Read full book review >

TUKAMA TOOTLES THE FLUTE by Phillis Gershator
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"Endnote on sources and local references. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-7)"
THE BOSSY GALLITO by Lucia M. Gonzalez
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"A glossary and several notes (also bilingual) about the story, illustrations, and culture are excellent addenda. (Folklore/Picture book. 3-8)"
A tale that was also recently retold by Alma Flor Ada, with handsomely decorative illustrations by Kathleen Kuchera, as The Rooster Who Went to His Uncle's Wedding (1993) now appears in a bilingual edition with a setting based on Miami's ``Little Havana.'' The story, a less bloodthirsty variant of the cumulative tale Joseph Jacobs called ``The Old Woman and Her Pig,'' is so appealing that most collections could easily use both versions. Read full book review >
THE BRICK HOUSE BURGLARS by Peni R. Griffin
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"But they react to the clues in dribs and drabs; most readers will outpace them on the guesswork. (Fiction. 9-12)"
An obvious villain and an archetypal misunderstood youth are on the scene for a mild-mannered mystery about four girls and the abandoned house that becomes their neighborhood hideout. Read full book review >
YOUNG JOHN QUINCY by Cheryl Harness
BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 1, 1994

"Notes, maps, diagrams and bibliography provide further context, but—as she did with Three Young Pilgrims (1992)— Harness makes historical incidents nearly incomprehensible by densely packing her pages with name- and event-dropping. (Picture book. 6-9)"
``Johnny's'' father is away at the Constitutional Congress when this book opens; it will be another year before the Declaration of Independence is written. Read full book review >
WHAT FOOD IS THIS? by Rosmarie Hausherr
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

Again, Hausherr (What Instrument Is This?, 1992) makes creative use of question-and-answer format, in this case to survey kinds of food. Read full book review >
SOPHIE IN THE SADDLE by Dick King-Smith
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"Does multiculturalism extend only to those who don't share our mother tongue) But even second-best Sophie is better-than-average young reader fare, and Parkins's frequent drawings continue to be witty and precise. (Fiction. 5- 9)"
King-Smith's "determined" Sophie, who first appeared, at four, in Sophie's Snail (1989), has always been a winning character; such vicissitudes as a suburban domicile, obstreperous twin brothers, and her parents' proscriptions against pets (mellowing more with each book) have never diverted her from her goal of becoming a "lady farmer." Read full book review >
THE SHELF-PAPER JUNGLE by Diana Engel
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"A gentle, reassuring message about the durability of friendship. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Another bittersweet little tale of loss and change in a relationship that's been strengthened by shared artistic endeavors (see also Eleanor, Arthur, and Claire, 1992). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >