Children's Book Reviews (page 3216)

THE DRAGON THAT ATE SUMMER by Brenda Seabrooke
ANIMALS
Released: April 29, 1992

"Appealing fantasy in a briskly drawn realistic setting. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Alastair McKnight has just sabotaged his own summer plans by breaking his collarbone while careening along on a ``dog-powered skateboard train.'' Chafing at his confinement, he's delighted to find a tiny four-pound dragon, eating Mom's petunias. Read full book review >
THE PERFECT SPOT by Robert J. Blake
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 29, 1992

"The interplay between parent and child, each dedicated to his own valuable pursuit, is as appealing as the lovely play of light through trees and water. (Picture book. 4-9)"
An illustrator who made a fine debut with his oil paintings for Weller's Riptide (1990) turns to watercolor for his own story about an artist on a woodland expedition with his son. Read full book review >

THE GREEN GOURD by C.W. Hunter
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 29, 1992

"A real, well- paced story; good fun. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
``Never pull a green gourd afore it's ripe, or it'll witch ye sure.'' The old woman knows this bit of lore, but since she's lost her only dipper in the rushing stream where she gets water, she risks picking one. Read full book review >
BRAVO, TANYA by Patricia Lee Gauch
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 29, 1992

"A lovely, warm story about dancing, learning, and respecting one's own unique identity while adapting to an activity with established rules. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The beguiling preschooler who won the right to go to dancing lessons with her big sister in Dance, Tanya (1989) discovers that the class poses an unexpected challenge: distracted by the teacher's claps and her loud counting voice, Tanya has trouble following the music. Read full book review >
THE KEYS TO MY KINGDOM by Lydia Dabcovich
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 28, 1992

"A straightforward-looking presentation of an old favorite with a couple of nice extra dimensions. (Folklore/Picture book. 3-8)"
The traditional chant appears here in three languages (English, French, Spanish) and is given a new ``key'': artist's tools, wielded by a pigtailed young artist who can be found in each picture, following the route described and finally arranging the flowers in the basket and using her paints to depict what she has seen. Read full book review >

MRS. FITZ'S FLAMINGOS by Kevin McCloskey
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 28, 1992

"Yorinks and Egielski this isn't, but worth a try nonetheless. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A solitary lady decides to improve her view of ``a sagging tar-paper roof, and the back sides of some billboards'' by putting up plastic flamingos, which she buys two at a time when she does errands in her Brooklyn neighborhood. Read full book review >
THE CIRCUS by Heidi Goennel
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 28, 1992

"(Picture book. 3-7)"
An illustrator distinguished by her elegant composition, sophisticated bright color, and simplified forms surveys some of the big top's most compelling visual images: elephants, a spotlit ringmaster, trapeze artists, animal tamers, clowns, etc. For collections that must choose, Ehlert's vibrant stylizations (Circus, p. 322) are more innovative and arresting; but Goennel's more realistic representation is pleasant, and makes a good introduction to a favorite experience. Read full book review >
BROTHER BILLY BRONTO'S BYGONE BLUES BAND by David F. Birchman
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 28, 1992

"Good fun. (Picture book. 5-10)"
In a cadenced narrative dancing with wordplay, Birchman describes a hot band that includes ``Rex the King Tyrone on the slide trombone...a mean allosaurus saxophonist nicknamed Lizard Lips Grace...[and] the heart of the band...Brother Billy Bronto. Read full book review >
GREEDYANNA by Frank Remkiewicz
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 28, 1992

"This slight tale is not as funny as it hopes to be, but the text's poker-faced exaggeration and the cheerful cartoony illustrations will strike a familiar chord in many families. (Picture book. 3- 7)"
A cautionary tall tale: Eddie's little sister is going through what her parents hopefully term ``a phase'' whose key word is ``Mine!'' While her family patiently waits it out, Anna monopolizes the food (except for lima beans), the house (the others move to the garage), and the family car (she rides while they push). Read full book review >
THE MAN WHO WAS TOO LAZY TO FIX THINGS by Phyllis Krasilovsky
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 28, 1992

The author of an old favorite, The Man Who Didn't Wash His Dishes (1950), comes up with a fable about a man who doesn't bother to maintain his fine new house. Read full book review >
THE GILDED CAT by Catherine Dexter
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 23, 1992

"An intriguing, if uneven, ghost story from the author of The Oracle Doll (1985). (Fiction. 11-14)"
A small, catlike figurine that Maggie picks up at a Boston yard sale turns out to be the mummy of a Pharaoh's prized pet—and the Pharaoh wants it back. Read full book review >
WHILE I SLEEP by Mary Calhoun
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: April 23, 1992

"The idea here is trite, but Young's imaginative visualization is a pleasure. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Like Ginsburg's Asleep, Asleep (below), another bedtime survey of sleepers, inspired by a child's questions. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >