An engrossing tale of a dangerous teen romance.

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Girl on the Brink

A debut novel shows that abusive relationships can occur in upper-middle-class suburban towns involving victims smart enough to know better.

Conducting an interview for her summer internship, 17-year-old Indian Valley resident Chloe Quinn encounters Kieran Dubrowski for the first time—and thinks he is annoying and intrusive. But Kieran is obviously interested in her. And with her brother and best friend both at camps, her father living with his girlfriend in New York City, and her mother escaping her marital difficulties with prescription medication and alcohol, Chloe not only agrees to go out with Kiernan, but finds his attention flattering. She overlooks his possessiveness—gratified that he is that involved with her—and dismisses his violent temper as an unfortunate result of his broken home. If her other friends seem resentful, she reasons that they are probably just jealous that she has a boyfriend. As Kieran’s behavior grows increasingly erratic, Chloe finally realizes that she needs to end the relationship, but her attempts to distance herself only lead to greater peril. Kieran proves himself to be not just abusive and emotionally disturbed, but also incredibly devious and canny, as he tries to turn the tables on her. Will Chloe break free, restore her battered relationships with friends and family, and regain her self-confidence? Hoag (co-author of Peace in the Hood: Working with Gang Members to End the Violence, 2014, etc.) creates teenage characters that are realistic, contemporary adolescents, not the typically idealized innocents. While there are hints of Kieran’s true nature, he is at first a likable character, if a bit narcissistic. Chloe’s vulnerability, due to her father’s physical and mother’s emotional desertions, enhance the reader’s ability to sympathize with her. Although largely a cautionary tale, the novel also contains enough suspense to keep it from becoming preachy. Teens may read it for the story, belatedly realizing that they’ve learned a lesson.

An engrossing tale of a dangerous teen romance.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Melange Books - Fire and Ice

Review Posted Online: Aug. 8, 2016

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The writing is merely serviceable, and one can’t help but wish the author had found a way to present her material as...

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THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ

An unlikely love story set amid the horrors of a Nazi death camp.

Based on real people and events, this debut novel follows Lale Sokolov, a young Slovakian Jew sent to Auschwitz in 1942. There, he assumes the heinous task of tattooing incoming Jewish prisoners with the dehumanizing numbers their SS captors use to identify them. When the Tätowierer, as he is called, meets fellow prisoner Gita Furman, 17, he is immediately smitten. Eventually, the attraction becomes mutual. Lale proves himself an operator, at once cagey and courageous: As the Tätowierer, he is granted special privileges and manages to smuggle food to starving prisoners. Through female prisoners who catalog the belongings confiscated from fellow inmates, Lale gains access to jewels, which he trades to a pair of local villagers for chocolate, medicine, and other items. Meanwhile, despite overwhelming odds, Lale and Gita are able to meet privately from time to time and become lovers. In 1944, just ahead of the arrival of Russian troops, Lale and Gita separately leave the concentration camp and experience harrowingly close calls. Suffice it to say they both survive. To her credit, the author doesn’t flinch from describing the depravity of the SS in Auschwitz and the unimaginable suffering of their victims—no gauzy evasions here, as in Boy in the Striped Pajamas. She also manages to raise, if not really explore, some trickier issues—the guilt of those Jews, like the tattooist, who survived by doing the Nazis’ bidding, in a sense betraying their fellow Jews; and the complicity of those non-Jews, like the Slovaks in Lale’s hometown, who failed to come to the aid of their beleaguered countrymen.

The writing is merely serviceable, and one can’t help but wish the author had found a way to present her material as nonfiction. Still, this is a powerful, gut-wrenching tale that is hard to shake off.

Pub Date: Sept. 4, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-06-279715-5

Page Count: 272

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: July 17, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2018

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To use the parlance of the period, a highly relevant retrospective.

SUMMER OF '69

Nantucket, not Woodstock, is the main attraction in Hilderbrand’s (Winter in Paradise, 2018, etc.) bittersweet nostalgia piece about the summer of 1969.

As is typical with Hilderbrand’s fiction, several members of a family have their says. Here, that family is the “stitched together” Foley-Levin clan, ruled over by the appropriately named matriarch, Exalta, aka Nonny, mother of Kate Levin. Exalta’s Nantucket house, All’s Fair, also appropriately named, is the main setting. Kate’s three older children, Blair, 24, Kirby, 20, and Tiger, 19, are products of her first marriage, to Wilder Foley, a war veteran, who shot himself. Second husband David Levin is the father of Jessie, who’s just turned 13. Tiger has been drafted and sends dispatches to Jessie from Vietnam. Kirby has been arrested twice while protesting the war in Boston. (Don’t tell Nonny!) Blair is married and pregnant; her MIT astrophysicist husband, Angus, is depressive, controlling, and deceitful—the unmelodramatic way Angus’ faults sneak up on both Blair and the reader is only one example of Hilderbrand’s firm grasp on real life. Many plot elements are specific to the year. Kirby is further rebelling by forgoing Nantucket for rival island Martha’s Vineyard—and a hotel job close to Chappaquiddick. Angus will be working at Mission Control for the Apollo 11 lunar landing. Kirby has difficult romantic encounters, first with her arresting officer, then with a black Harvard student whose mother has another reason, besides Kirby’s whiteness, to distrust her. Pick, grandson of Exalta’s caretaker, is planning to search for his hippie mother at Woodstock. Other complications seem very up-to-date: a country club tennis coach is a predator and pedophile. Anti-Semitism lurks beneath the club’s genteel veneer. Kate’s drinking has accelerated since Tiger’s deployment overseas. Exalta’s toughness is seemingly untempered by grandmotherly love. As always, Hilderbrand’s characters are utterly convincing and immediately draw us into their problems, from petty to grave. Sometimes, her densely packed tales seem to unravel toward the end. This is not one of those times.

To use the parlance of the period, a highly relevant retrospective.

Pub Date: June 18, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-316-42001-3

Page Count: 432

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: March 31, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2019

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