THE FOLKLORE OF MANAGEMENT by Clarence B. Randall

THE FOLKLORE OF MANAGEMENT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Originally a series of articles which appeared under the same title in Dun's Review, The Folklore of Management presents a retired businessman's viewpoint about several aspects of the business world. Mr. Randall's approach is generally conservative and practical in an elementary way; it is also often naive. He raises objections to the formalizations of business relationships, feeling that the ""new management men"" make the mistake of placing too much emphasis on technique, confusing the substance of management with its working tools. he feels that the best corporations are those dominated, not by men, but by ideas, and he points out the twin dangers of management by committee and management by a single self-appointed-over-worked executive --""production wizards"". He regrets the prevalence of the over-specialized executive, content to remain always a staff member; business methods which rely on the expense-account; and what seems to him swollen executive salaries and benefits. He discusses the businessman's traditional distrust of politics; the results of increased social benefits for workers and management alike; the necessity for a uniform policy on retirement; and, inevitably, the threat of Communism. By and large there is little here that management men would find objectionable. The most challenging part of the book is its title and that was suggested by Dun's Review.

Pub Date: Sept. 12th, 1961
Publisher: Little, Brown-A.M.P.