COPING WITH FOOD ALLERGY by Claude A. Frazier

COPING WITH FOOD ALLERGY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

That most idiosyncratic of causes and effects which hits ten to fifteen percent of the country is here discussed with considerable specificity in relation to the foods you eat (indicating but not pursuing other malefactors). Very often allergies are hereditary, sometimes the result of emotional stress; but here we consider the likeliest offenders and half of this book (about 150 pages) presents milk, wheat and egg-free menus and recipes (other foods, say, fish, berries, peas, corn, chocolate, nuts are easier to avoid altogether). And by the way the soybean is not all that it has, of late, so salubriously seemed. Frazier's primary, new (to us) contention, developed in one chapter, is to prophylactically avoid having an allergic child -- the pregnant mother can perhaps do so by eliminating the commonest allergenic foods from her diet. The appendix lists further allergens, reading, special products for special diets and where available, etc.

Pub Date: Aug. 1st, 1974
Publisher: Quadrangle/The New York Times Book Co.