ONE-WAY TO NEW YORK by Claude Roy

ONE-WAY TO NEW YORK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This flows, gently, immemorably, in concentric circles around Leone, whose apartment during a hot summer in New York is a ""sort of small-scale D.P. camp"" for a group of emigres, leading a peripheral existence. She seems to catalyze them-- they remember, they confide, they muse: Luis, a political exile from South America; self-dramatizing Johanna, a refugee from Hitler's Europe, who talks about returning to Berlin or committing suicide; Aime, an actor in search of a part: Hugo who evades through drugs and alcohol; Nancy and Stuart, the young lovers. During the course of the months spent here Leone becomes ill, depressed, and they all for a time put aside their personal hang-ups; at the end she goes away, to Paris, with a lover, and they find other resolutions... Somewhat formless, as is perhaps the purpose and the inevitable reflection of these disparate, displaced lives, and although it is well enough done (Roy wrote the earlier The Agony of Love-Pantheon- 1959-- the only one of his novels translated here) the reader is just as likely to be inattentive as involved.

Pub Date: Oct. 24th, 1966
Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill