RUM, SLAVES AND MOLASSES: The Story of New England's Triangular Trade by Clifford Lindsey Alderman

RUM, SLAVES AND MOLASSES: The Story of New England's Triangular Trade

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The interiors of slave ships have been revisited often enough recently, so that few of the particulars of the Sukey's 1802 voyage really come as a surprise. But Alderman does excel in his discussion of the African side of the operation -- showing how captains bargained with the white middlemen of ""factors"", how slaves were captured in intertribe warfare or by bribing corrupt witch doctors, and how traders shopped for slaves to fit their particular requirements -- proud Ashanti, strong Ibo, intelligent Foulahs. On the other side of the Atlantic, there's a very brief look at the conditions on Caribbean plantations (particularly the harsh punishments dealt out), the major slave rebellions such as the successful revolt of the Maroons in Jamaica, and, by way of contrast, an introduction to some of Rhode Island and Massachusetts' wealthiest slave merchants. None of this has the depth or perspective of, say, Meltzer's Slavery (Vol. II, p. 681) but Alderman's method of singling out individuals and following a typical voyage will reach younger, less sophisticated readers.

Pub Date: Sept. 18th, 1972
Publisher: Crowell-Collier