THE EMPTY PULPIT: A Study in Preaching as Communication by Clyde Reid

THE EMPTY PULPIT: A Study in Preaching as Communication

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The author continues the critique of the contemporary Protestant church he began in a recent volume, The God Evaders. Here, he Concentrates on the crisis that he believes to have overtaken the most distinguishing mark of Protestantism--the sermon. After arraying seven charges against preaching, as voiced by its critics, he counters with the claims of its defenders, and then proceeds to show these to be inadequate, mainly because they do not take seriously the problems raised with respect to preaching as a form of communication to contemporary listeners. In Stances of new models of preaching in which dialogue is the governing principle are briefly described, and are cited as holding out a hope that preaching might gain for itself a new and more pertinent function today. Although relying heavily on quotations from other writers, the author also gives indication of his own deep concern about preaching as a form of communication indispensable to the church. This is a book to be read by lay people as well as clergy, seminary faculties, and church officials.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1967
Publisher: Harper & Row