SOUTHERN GENERALS by Col. Red Reeder

SOUTHERN GENERALS

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

In this companion volume to his Northern Generals, Colonel Reeder uses General Robert E. Lee as the spine for his studies of other Confederate generals. However, when he suggests that Lee was ""the greatest tactician the American nation has produced,"" MacArthur students will give him a fight. Among the leading generals discussed are Stonewall Jackson, Jeb Stuart, Samuel E. Cooper, Albert Sidney Johnston, Joseph E. Johnston, Pierre Beauregard, George E. Pickett, James Longstreet and others. For readers not too familiar with these men, Colonel Reeder's thumbnail portraits are satisfyingly brisk and colorful. Otherwise, Civil War buffs will not be overly impressed, nor has the author unearthed anything new by way of scholarship. His battles go by like skirmishes; there is seldom any real involvement with men fighting or the scene of battle. Jefferson Davis had a much tighter grip on his generals than Lincoln had on his. But Davis's generals squabbled more, were aristocratic and headstrong. And their States squabbled more, whereas the Union was a union. Davis's greatest fault was his insistence on military command, whereof he knew nothing , coupled with lack of insight into his general's characters. Lincoln's insight was his greatest virtue...This is a fast, readable overview.

Publisher: Duell, Sloan & Pearce