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THIS SIDE OF BRIGHTNESS by Colum McCann

THIS SIDE OF BRIGHTNESS

By Colum McCann

Pub Date: April 2nd, 1998
ISBN: 0-8050-5452-9
Publisher: Henry Holt

An ambitious, idiosyncratic, moving saga of immigrant life by Irish expatriate McCann (stories: Fishing the Sloe-black River, 1996; Songdogs, 1994, etc.). Writing in a prose of considerable allusive power, McCann ingeniously uses the NYC subway as a central symbol. In 1916, the excavation of subway tunnels gives immigrant Con O’Leary a chance at a decent job, otherwise denied to recent Irish arrivals. Among his fellow “sandhogs” is Nathan Walker, a young black man also determined to secure some part of the alluring American Dream. When O’Leary dies in one of the frequent cave-ins afflicting the massive project, Walker elects to help his devastated widow and young daughter. Over the succeeding years, a complex affection draws Nathan and Con’s daughter Eleanor together, and eventually, despite the considerable risks involved, they marry. In a brisk narrative spanning eight decades, McCann finds in the struggles and fates of Eleanor and Nathan’s descendants a vivid outline of the experiences of outcasts and immigrants in American society. In a sharply ironic touch the subway tunnels that had been, for Con and Nathan, a way into the mainstream have become, by the 1980’s, a home for those on society’s far fringes. Treefrog, a homeless man who’s taken shelter beneath Riverside Park, has been so worn down by his social exile that he’s uncertain of his past and his own name. McCann further stresses the increasing harshness of modern life by juxtaposing his depiction of Treefrog’s impoverished, hallucinatory existence against some transcendent images of the natural world, including, most memorably, a recurrent image of a flock of cranes. A poet’s version of a family saga, mingling original and persuasive imagery with a story of great dramatic impact—and an angry, convincing criticism of the manner in which American society has repeatedly frustrated the attempts of outsiders to make a home. A haunting novel, by a writer emerging as a major talent (First printing of 35,000; Book-of-the-Month alternate selection; author tour)