PRINCE CHARLIE AND HIS LADIES by Compton Mackenzie

PRINCE CHARLIE AND HIS LADIES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Last May Dennis Wheatley's book, Old Rowley (Dutton) presented a friendly, human picture of a much-abused monarch, Charles II. Now comes Compton Mackenzie, with a book which also paints him as much more of a person than the usual biographer allows, and in which he makes no bones about his disgust with the inadequacies of previous chroniclers. The Wheatley book is a more general picture of the man and the kind; this is definitely the story of the Young Chevalier and his ladies, high-born and low-born. Many of them have not been drawn so fully before; and Charles, in his relation to them, takes on different personality. The substance is there for a better book than Mackenzie gives us. But the title -- and his name -- should sell the book to those who like parlor and bedroom romances of the great, the near great and the would-be great.

Publisher: Knopf