MEMOIRS OF A BULLFIGHTER by Conchita Cintron

MEMOIRS OF A BULLFIGHTER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Leaping Lima! A female torero-a? Yes indeedy and it was little Conchita Cintron, American-born, Peruvian bred who was knocking 'em dead in the ring at the tender age of fifteen. She went on to become the world's most renowned woman bullfighter and in this autobiography describes gore and glory, drama and deceits, honor and ignominy, and ""the misery of what seemed so grand."" But that's more or less looking back in perspective because her career was ole 90% of the way according to what she describes here. Her mentor was one Rhy da Camara, an ex-revolutionary who owned and operated a stable close to her childhood home. He taught his overeager young protege the line points of riding, let her try her skill as a rejoncador (a mounted torero) and finally let her face the moment of truth on foot. Her skill and daring won accolades as she traveled through Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador, Venezuela, Portugal, France, Morocco and finally to Spain where she was almost arrested for refusing an order to fight from horseback only. The best moments are when she describes her own emotions and how she came to know the heights of exuberant victory and the shock and tragedy of sudden death. An unusual story that will attract the aficionado. And it may appeal to young girls who prefer their heroines heroic.

Pub Date: May 6th, 1968
Publisher: Holt, Rinchart & Winston