THE SILVER STRING by Cora Jarrett
Kirkus Star

THE SILVER STRING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Here is a writer who shows new facets, new depths with each new book. Her first novel, Night Over Fitch's Pond, though definitely a psychological novel, was sold as a mystery, but made a definite mark on its readers; her next two novels, The Ginkgo Tree and Strange Houses both indicated flexibility in handling unusual psychological situations and originality of story form. Then came a remarkable collection of short stories, I Asked No Other Thing. And now comes her most mature novel, the sounding the depths of a woman's mind and heart, in The Silver String. Usually anything tending towards the stream of consciousness form becomes artificial, overstrained. This, in the two thirds of the book that turn the thought inward and backward, give no impression of unreality. Rather -- with the woman -- you are sharing her past life, fitting the pieces together to form the present, picking up the threads and going forward with her toward the future. Primarily a woman's book; to men the woman's character may seem a trifle shadowy, to women she will seem alive. And primarily for women to whom the psychological approach is the interesting one.

Pub Date: Nov. 4th, 1937
Publisher: Farrar & Rinehart