THE NEW YORK TIMES COOK BOOK by Craig-Ed. Claiborne

THE NEW YORK TIMES COOK BOOK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A giant of a cookbook of which the dominant characteristic that emerges is the immense variety offered at every level. The usual order is observed:- appetizers; soups; meats; poultry; seafood; egg, cheese, rice and pasta dishes; vegetables; salad and salad dressings; sauces and butters; breads and pastry; preserves; desserts; cheese; wine; beverages; spices and garnishes; weights and measures, including a table of foreign equivalents. And at the close, an unusual feature is a list of sources for ingredients (primarily M.Y.C.). Within these predictable categories, there are a great many dishes of foreign origin; there are national specialities and hard to find recipes (pirozhki, knock-worst, shashlik, tempura, etc. ordinarily found in speciality cookbooks). The complete would find this overwhelming, and the presentation of recipes- though straightforward and simple for the average housewife, might seem to assume more knowledge than the totally inexperienced bring to the role of cook. This is not a gourmet cookbook, though there are lots of gourmet dishes. There is little dependence on shortcuts- and not enough attention given to limitations on time and budget, nor on uses of leftovers. But granted a reasonably well equipped kitchen, some experience, and a few other cookbooks, this will afford stimulus to the imagination and variety to the menu.

Publisher: Harper