Briskly sending up fraying Southern social traditions, this hilarious debut celebrates one value that’s universal: true...

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NEVER SIT DOWN IN A HOOPSKIRT AND OTHER THINGS I LEARNED IN SOUTHERN BELLE HELL

Fresh from a series of boarding-school expulsions, Jane, 17, returns to Bienville, Ala., to cap her high-school career.

Residing with Grandmama, who is intent on turning her into a Southern Belle, Jane enters a longstanding beauty—sorry, achievement—pageant, introducing the cream of wealthy, white Bienville maidenhood to society. She’s appalled to be selected as one of five Magnolia Maids; but times are changing. Recovering from a massive oil spill and seeking to attract investment, town leaders hope to project a modern, diverse (post-Emancipation) image. Along with traditional belles Ashley and Mallory, this year’s Maids include Zara, daughter of the African-American communications tycoon who's bringing needed jobs to his hometown; Brandi Lyn, representing Bienville’s disadvantaged residents; and Jane, straddling categories. (Her mom was a town blueblood; her Greek shipping-magnate dad anything but.) When not engaged in Maid duties, Jane obsesses over Luke Churchville, whom she was sent to boarding school to get away from but never stopped thinking about. While diversity is easier to say than practice, the girls discover sisterhood is powerful, and getting even with two-timing boyfriends while wearing hoopskirts is a great leveler. (For best results, avoid vodka.)

Briskly sending up fraying Southern social traditions, this hilarious debut celebrates one value that’s universal: true friendship. (Fiction. 12 & up)

Pub Date: June 14, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-60684-131-0

Page Count: 304

Publisher: Egmont USA

Review Posted Online: May 4, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2011

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Magic, tennis action, and family secrets are woven into an original coming-of-age tale.

LEGACY AND THE QUEEN

A 12-year-old girl living in a kingdom ruled by a mysterious queen dreams of attaining her sport’s highest prize.

Legacy Petrin lives and works in the financially strapped orphanage in the provinces run by her father and rises early every day to practice tennis with her old racket. After her best friend, Van, excitedly tells her about a scholarship competition for a spot at an esteemed academy and the opportunity to try out for the national championships, Legacy runs away to the city to compete. After winning, she learns there is still much she doesn’t know: The players are not just proficient in tennis, but also have magical skills that they use to their advantage. Legacy befriends Pippa, a knowledgeable girl from an elite tennis family, and acquires a builder, or coach, Javi. With Pippa and Javi at her side, Legacy makes her way through the competition, despite sabotage attempts, learning secrets about her own family along the way. Legacy is a strong character, and the secondary characters also have interesting backstories. The storyline is reminiscent of other dystopian stories, but centering tennis—with lively descriptions of matches that give a strong sense of the sport—is an unusual touch. Most characters are white, although Javi is brown-skinned, and some other characters of color are mentioned.

Magic, tennis action, and family secrets are woven into an original coming-of-age tale. (Fantasy. 9-12)

Pub Date: Sept. 3, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-949520-03-3

Page Count: 208

Publisher: Granity Studios

Review Posted Online: June 23, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2019

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A carefully researched, precisely written tour de force; unforgettable and wrenching.

CODE NAME VERITY

Breaking away from Arthurian legends (The Winter Prince, 1993, etc.), Wein delivers a heartbreaking tale of friendship during World War II.

In a cell in Nazi-occupied France, a young woman writes. Like Scheherezade, to whom she is compared by the SS officer in charge of her case, she dribbles out information—“everything I can remember about the British War Effort”—in exchange for time and a reprieve from torture. But her story is more than a listing of wireless codes or aircraft types. Instead, she describes her friendship with Maddie, the pilot who flew them to France, as well as the real details of the British War Effort: the breaking down of class barriers, the opportunities, the fears and victories not only of war, but of daily life. She also describes, almost casually, her unbearable current situation and the SS officer who holds her life in his hands and his beleaguered female associate, who translates the narrative each day. Through the layers of story, characters (including the Nazis) spring to life. And as the epigraph makes clear, there is more to this tale than is immediately apparent. The twists will lead readers to finish the last page and turn back to the beginning to see how the pieces slot perfectly, unexpectedly into place.

A carefully researched, precisely written tour de force; unforgettable and wrenching. (Historical fiction. 14 & up)

Pub Date: May 15, 2012

ISBN: 978-1-4231-5219-4

Page Count: 352

Publisher: Hyperion

Review Posted Online: Feb. 15, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2012

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