Current Affairs Book Reviews

SENSEMAKING by Christian Madsbjerg
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 21, 2017

"The author employs jargon, to be sure, but he explains each piece of jargon with admirable clarity."
A business consultant argues for the importance of learning through human interactions rather than always emphasizing computer-generated data. Read full book review >
A COLONY IN A NATION by Chris Hayes
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 21, 2017

"A timely and impassioned argument for social justice."
Profound contrasts in policing and incarceration reveal disparate Americas. Read full book review >

SEASTEADING by Joe Quirk
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 21, 2017

"While the authors' enthusiasm should be taken with more than a grain of salt, they raise ideas worth considering and offer hope for a future when life on land has grown grim."
The founder and communications director of the Seasteading Institute make a case that the survival of the planet depends on moving out from the land onto the sea. Read full book review >
A QUESTION OF ORDER by Basharat Peer
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 21, 2017

"A knowledgeable journalist astutely delineates a troubling global move toward the right wing."
A Kashmiri journalist examines a new generation of tyrants threatening the (illusory) promises of liberal democracy. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 21, 2017

"An entertaining look inside the White House."
President Barack Obama's former deputy chief of staff makes her literary debut in a candid and charming memoir of her unexpected career in government. Read full book review >

REVOLUTION FOR DUMMIES by Bassem Youssef
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 21, 2017

"If you want to understand the Arab Spring—even though it was really the African Spring, set off by a 'small puny motherfucking country called Tunisia'—then this odd book is just the guide."
Egyptian comic Youssef, a doctor-turned-satirist-turned-international media sensation, recounts the revolution that brought down Hosni Mubarak in 2011. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 16, 2017

"A blend of accessible economic theory and practical reform, of much interest to any reader whose common cause is with the 99 rather than the 1 percent."
The declining middle class represents not just a lost economic stratum, but the disappeared basis for the quaint idea of representative democracy. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A strong case that deserves a wider readership than just policy wonks."
An examination of economic inequality—unsurprisingly, the title refers to race as well as economic class. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 14, 2017

"An alarming account but one suggesting that, armed with knowledge, we can reverse this way of treating the plants that feed us and find a way toward a more sustainable diet."
A convincing argument that the agricultural revolution that has made food more readily available around the world contains the seeds of its own destruction. Read full book review >
UTOPIA FOR REALISTS by Rutger Bregman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"Raise the minimum wage? No. Give everyone a basic income, smash the machines, and work a couple of days per week—that's the ticket. A provocative pleasure to contemplate."
A spirited and practical manifesto for improving the odds of making a heaven on Earth. Read full book review >
EVERYTHING UNDER THE HEAVENS by Howard W. French
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A lucid if stolid overview of regional history, useful for students of Pacific affairs in playing out scenarios of what might happen next."
A long-view look at events that are making China's neighbors—and much of the world beyond—very nervous indeed. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"Full of object lessons, this is a valuable overview for students of international commerce."
There are new markets to share out there, and the old capitalist way of doing things won't be the one that captures them. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >